The Council of State Governments will be offering a variety of webinars designed to educate and inform state leaders on a range of policy-related issues. Registration for these sessions is complimentary. 

Each webinar offered by CSG will be available for viewing on our website within a week of its scheduled date.

  • Essential Health Benefits: An Overview for State Legislators
    Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2-3 p.m. EST

  • Prescription Drug Abuse: A Growing Epidemic
    Presented by CSG's National Center for Interstate Compacts
    Wednesday, March 7, 1:30-2:30 p.m. EST
  • Protecting Your Online Identity
    Presented by CSG's National Leadership Center 
    Thursday, March 15, 2-3 p.m. EDT

Florida launched its prescription drug monitoring program yesterday--a significant development that was applauded by other state leaders like Kentucky's Governor Steve Beshear.  A prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) or prescription drug monitoring program (PMP) functions as an online database that various officials can access to see an individual's prescription history. Keeping a record of prescription history could, for example, help a pharmacist identify someone who was trying to get prescriptions for pain relief filled multipe times at different pharmacies--thus indicating drug abuse by that person and/or an intent to sell the drugs.

More than 40 states currently have prescription monitoring programs aimed at reducing the growing epidemic of prescription drug abuse. While these programs are a significant accomplishment in the fight against prescription drug abuse, states still are largely unable to share information about prescription drug data on an interstate level. 

E-Newsletter Issue #53: August 5, 2010

Kentucky pharmacies filled nearly 700,000 prescriptions written by prescribers in its seven border states last year.

That doesn’t even count the prescriptions written in nonborder states, including more than 9,000 written in Michigan, according to Dave Hopkins, project manager for the state’s prescription drug database, the Kentucky All-Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting, or KASPER.

“...

Kansas Senator Vicki Schmidt will be making a presentation about the Prescription Drug Monitoring compact at the National Conference of State Legislators Legislative Summit July 28 in Louisville, KY.  The compact, which was developed by CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts, aims to allow states to share prescription drug data across state lines.  Senator Schmidt, who chaired both CSG’s advisory committee and drafting team, has been instrumental in the compact’s development.  CSG staff will also be available during the session should any questions come up about the compact. 

Download Sen. Schmidt's Power Point Presentation:  Prescription Drug Monitoring Compact

Crady deGolian and Rick Masters recently spoke about CSG’s ongoing effort to assist states in developing a prescription drug monitoring compact at the sixth annual Harold Rogers PDMP Meeting in Washington DC.  The meeting, which was presented by the Alliance for State with Prescription Drug Programs, drew state PMP administrators, federal officials and national organizations with an interest in reducing the abuse of prescription drugs.  During the presentation Crady and Rick educated the group about compact law, provided specific details about the ongoing PMP compact, and answered several questions about the future of the project.

State eNews Issue #38 | January 20, 2010
 

Kentucky has a pretty good program for monitoring the dispensation of prescription drugs.

The Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting system—or KASPER for short—requires anyone who writes a prescription in the state to report it to the system within seven days, said Dave Hopkins, KASPER program manager.

As our world shrinks and the enormity of specific policy issues grows, multiple states are finding themselves facing similar, if not identical, situations. While states must act to address current and emerging problems, they are not required to act alone. In fact, states may find that acting in cooperation with their neighbors affords significant opportunities for creative problem solving, economies of scale and the bolstering of state rights over a range of topics. Interstate compacts are not new, nor are they unfamiliar to the modern policymaker. However, the innovative ways in which interstate compacts may be used are evolving before us – seeking to tackle a host of issues not previously addressed by this interstate mechanism. As states struggle with nearly unparalleled financial downturns and revenue declines, interstate compacts are an efficient tool to promote cooperative regional or national action.