CSG Midwest
On May 3, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act (AHCA) to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
CSG Midwest
Last summer, as insurers filed their individual health insurance plan rate premiums for 2017, it became clear that something was wrong: Rates in 31 states shot up by double digits (triple digits for Arizona); overall, the average increase in premiums was 25 percent....

The Urban Institute released an analysis of the state-by-state impact of the AHCA, 2019 to 2028. The Urban Institute looked at the impact of the proposal on state funding (see Table 5). If states made up for the loss of federal funds with state funds, it would require a 16.1 percent increase in all states' Medicaid spending over the ten year period. 

Yesterday the Congressional Budget Office – or CBO – released its cost estimate for the House Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. All told, the report says, the federal deficit would be reduced by $337 billion over the 2017-2026 decade. Reducing the federal deficit is welcome news to most federal policymakers.

On Monday, March 6, the House Republicans released the American Health Care Act, the measure intended to fulfill their campaign pledges to repeal and replace the Obama administration Affordable Care Act. Here is the summary provided by the House Republicans. 

Of primary interest to state policymakers, the House plan implements a per capita cap in Medicaid funding, beginning in 2020, based on FFY 2016 spending levels. The House Republican plan has not been scored by the Congressional Budget Office so there are no publicly available data on how much this change will cost states and save the federal government.

Yesterday, in response to concerns about insurers pulling out of the ACA marketplaces and raising premiums, the federal government published proposed rules to stabilize the individual and small group health insurance markets.

In a press release, Dr. Patrick Conway, Acting Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services acknowledged the changes are short term relief “while future reforms are being debated.” 

Kaiser Health News has created a special website to keep track of news about changes to the Affordable Care Act. KHN says it will provide analysis, explanation, investigation and data on its site called Repeal & Replace Watch. You can bookmark this on your browser.

A new study from the Commonwealth Fund finds that repeal of two major federal spending provisions of the Affordable Care Act, insurance premium tax credits and the expansion of Medicaid, would ultimately lead to the loss of 2.6 million jobs in 2019. The data, generated by researchers at George Washington, breaks down the impact of repeal for each state. California would lose the most jobs, 334,000 their multistate economic forecasting model suggests, and Wyoming the least with 4,000 jobs lost.

A new study out of Michigan concludes that the state’s Medicaid expansion is to the state’s financial advantage.

When the legislature approved the expansion in 2013, it required that Michigan achieve other health care savings and revenue to offset the state match required starting Jan. 1, 2017 – or the state would reverse its expansion.

Health policies and programs in the states face an uncertain future with the election of Donald J. Trump. During his campaign he vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Currently 73 million Americans are enrolled in the Medicaid program, a federal-state partnership program for which the federal government pays 62 percent of total expenditures. A Medicaid block grant, one proposal under discussion, might provide the states more flexibility but also might transfer more financial responsibility, especially in the long term, to the states. 

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