Content Type

Since April, Congress has been working to rewrite the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act, or ESEA, also known as the No Child Left Behind Act. On July 8, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Student Success Act. The following week, the U.S. Senate passed a bipartisan compromise—the Every Child Achieves Act. Both the House and Senate bills have much in common, but also diverge on a few critical issues, such as school choice, accountability and national student test opt-outs. This webinar provides a briefing on the history of ESEA, details on the transformation of federal education policy, an update on the key ESEA differences currently being debated, and insights into what longstanding implications the new federal education policies will have for state governments.

U.S. military and civilian overseas voters are often located in remote areas abroad, lacking access to the voting information and technology used by stateside voters in their home voting precincts, making it challenging for Americans overseas to cast their ballots. Variations in how states conduct elections and, in particular, how absentee ballots are provided, returned and counted can make voting even more complex. In this FREE CSG eCademy webcast, members of The Council of State Governments’ Overseas Voting Initiative Policy Working Group explore policy recommendations that can help states improve the U.S. military and civilian overseas voting process.

Earlier this year, an unexpected outbreak of HIV in southern Indiana triggered a high-profile emergency response while demonstrating the dangerous link between substance abuse and certain infectious diseases. This FREE eCademy webcast explores lessons from Indiana's experience, policy options and the latest research on effective treatment of substance abuse.

Unfunded mandates. Congressional imposition. The erosion of federalism. These terms often are tossed around as state and the federal governments continue to navigate the tricky waters of federal-state relations, particularly in the legislative branch. In the second in a series of three all-star webinars about the state of federalism as it applies to the states and the federal government, CSG explores the roles of the Congress and state legislatures, highlighting the inter-workings of congressional and elected state legislators. Panelists provide concrete examples, including health care reform, to clarify this relationship, which is crucial to the smooth functioning of the states, but can sometimes be blurry and complicated.

Economics webcast

In the aftermath of the Great Recession, an increasing number of states, including several in the SLC region, are focused on increasing accountability and transparency in the disbursement of taxpayer dollars. Performance-based budgeting—which focuses on efficiency and effectiveness in outcomes—has emerged as a viable tool for states looking for an alternative to routinely funding government operations on a pro forma basis. This webinar provided an overview of performance-based budgeting and highlighted measures initiated in Oklahoma and Mississippi to implement this spending strategy.


As rideshare companies like Uber and Lyft are changing America’s transportation landscape, so too are they impacting state policy as legislators try to address insurance-related issues that have arisen around these services. This free eCademy webcast offered an essential briefing on the emerging insurance-related regulatory and legislative landscape surrounding these services. This eCademy session was part of a collaboration between CSG and The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation to inform state officials on insurance issues, while maintaining a commitment to an unbiased, nonpartisan and academic approach to programming.


Rural communities in the South continue to face serious challenges in getting highly educated students to return home after college graduation. Research indicates that education may be a cause and effect for this rural “brain drain” phenomenon, and also the key to reversing the trend. Studies have shown that efforts to improve rural education contribute to rapid economic development in those areas, while a more educated community can serve as a catalyst for business expansion and increased civic engagement. This complimentary webinar, presented by CSG South/SLC, highlights the impact of education on rural development and examines initiatives in rural communities to entice educated former residents to return and invest in their hometowns.

As states across the country continue to transform health care, achieving the balance between cost containment and high quality care remains a primary focus. CSG is pleased to present a FREE eCademy webcast featuring national health care expert Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, who explores strategies to improve the quality of health care delivery while minimizing costs. Brenner is the medical director of the Urban Health Institute at the Cooper University Healthcare as well as the founder and executive director of Camden (N.J.) Coalition of Healthcare Providers. He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013 for his work on addressing the health care needs of the chronically ill in impoverished communities in the U.S. This presentation was broadcast as part of CSG’s 2015 Medicaid Policy Academy in Washington, D.C.

All used nuclear fuel produced by the U.S. nuclear energy industry in the past 50 years—approximately 72,000 metric tons—if stacked end-to-end would cover an area the size of a football field to a depth of about seven yards. Although the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established a national program for the safe, permanent disposal of highly radioactive waste, currently there is no disposal site in the United States for spent rods from the more than 100 operating commercial nuclear reactors across the country. As the nation moves to reduce carbon emissions, nuclear energy may become an increasingly important element in the stability of the U.S. power system, intensifying the need for a permanent solution to spent fuel storage. This free webinar reviews current storage practices and explore challenges and opportunities for a permanent storage solution for the nation’s high-level radioactive spent fuel.

A 2014 report by the National Skills Coalition said middle-skill jobs—those that require more than a high school diploma, but less than a four-year degree—account for 54 percent of the United States’ labor market, but only 44 percent of the country’s workers are qualified for these types of positions. One way the skills gap—the gap between skills that employers seek and the skills available in the workforce—can be decreased is to use stackable credentials to improve worker capabilities and competencies. This FREE eCademy webcast, presented by the CSG National Task Force on Workforce Development and Education, highlights innovative programs that are helping students gain the competencies they need by offering stackable credentials and credits for talent development.