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By Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval

Throughout my career, I’ve had the distinct pleasure to serve Nevada as a legislator, gaming regulator, attorney general, federal judge and now as governor. To have worked in all three branches of government has broadened my perspective, and my experiences have been a tremendous asset in my current job as governor. Each branch is very distinct, and each position presents a unique set of challenges. That being said, the one constant, no matter the position, has been the necessity to make key decisions and, when the time comes, to lead.

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA—While states across the country have made changes to their public employee retirement plans, some of them have ended up in court for one key reason. “There’s a theme that comes where reform efforts have worked and where they don’t and a lot of them end up getting them challenged in court,” Robert D. Klausner, a partner with a law firm that handles retirement system cases, said during the CSG policy academy, “Accounting for the State of Public Pensions,” Saturday, Aug. 9. “The places where it doesn’t get challenged in court are places where employees have been engaged early in the process.”

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA—While public pension plans still face problems, the situation isn’t as bleak as the headlines report, according to Dana Bilyeu, executive director of the National Association of State Retirement Administrators. In fact, public pension plans across the country are 80 percent funded, on aggregate; that’s down from 101 percent funded in 2001, Bilyeu said. She spoke at The Council of State Governments policy academy, “Accounting for the State of Public Pensions,” Aug. 9.

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA—Alabama Rep. Mac Buttram thinks it’s about time people start thinking about career and technical education in a different way. Buttram recently was appointed to Gov. Robert Bentley’s new Alabama Workforce Council. The council, comprised primarily of state business leaders, is designed to help K-12 and higher education institutions in the state better meet the needs of businesses and industries. He was one of the featured speakers at CSG’s Policy Academy on Workforce Development, held Aug. 9 at the CSG National and CSG West Annual Conference in Alaska.

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA—The future of the country’s economic success appears to be a team effort. “One of the most important keys to our national growth and economic success is supporting a highly trained workforce,” West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin said at CSG’s Policy Academy on Workforce Development, held Aug. 9 at the CSG National and CSG West Annual Conference in Alaska. “Education is the number one qualifier for jobs of today and tomorrow.”

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By Beth Harwell, Tennessee House Speaker

Leadership, in its widest sense, is simply an extension of human talents, but it is of use for the benefit of others as much as for oneself.

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The Supreme Court held 6-2 in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action that voters may by ballot prohibit affirmative action in public university admission decisions.  In 2006, Michigan voters adopted a constitutional amendment that prohibited preferential treatment in admissions to public universities on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or...

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By Daniel Goleman

Ask a room of leaders “What should leaders do?” and you’ll likely hear only one response. A leader should get results. But how?

Leaders with the best results do not rely on only one leadership style; they incorporate several—seamlessly—depending on the situation.

Policymakers attending The Council of State Governments’ National and CSG West 2014 Annual Conference in Anchorage, Alaska, will have an opportunity hear about a new distance learning compact being developed by CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts....

When it comes to meeting the transportation needs of its residents, Alaska has some defining characteristics that set it apart from other states in the challenges it faces. “Alaska’s primary challenges stem primarily from its vastness, limited infrastructure and arctic climate,” said John R. Binder III, deputy commissioner for the Alaska Department of Transportation.

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