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Shortly after the U.S. Supreme Court in 2013 ruled portions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act related to voter IDs were outdated and unconstitutional, states took action. But laws in several states that have imposed strict new photo identification requirements for voters are in limbo, with courts questioning whether concerns over voter fraud outweigh individuals exercising their right to vote.

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WASHINGTON, D.C.—Many U.S.-based companies are in the process of reincorporating their headquarters to countries with lower corporate tax rates. This is commonly known as “inversions” or “expatriations” and takes place when a company merges or acquires a foreign company with the nearly exclusive purpose of paying lower corporate taxes.

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WASHINGTON, D.C.—October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Unfortunately, we are reminded nearly every week of the growing threat of being constantly connected to the web, with the reporting of high profile companies and organizations being victims of a cyberattack.

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WASHINGTON, D.C.—President Obama recently launched a new job training pilot program designed to train U.S. military veterans in solar installation. This program is a part of the president’s plan to advance solar energy, which is a core component of his overarching Climate Action Plan aimed at energy independence.

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The results of the Supreme Court’s long conference are in! The court granted a total of 11 petitions.

Two cases stand out as having a particular impact on CSG members. In Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, legislative congressional redistricting authority is on the line. And in Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar, the constitutionality of a common judicial conduct rule prohibiting candidates for judicial office from personally soliciting campaign funds is being challenged.

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WASHINGTON, D.C.—With less than a month before the Nov. 4 midterm elections, voting laws in eight states are being challenged in state and federal courts, often going all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. These recent court challenges are due, for the most part, to varying state’s interpretation of two Supreme Court decisions in recent years.

In 2008, the high court ruled in Crawford v. Marion County Election Board that an Indiana law requiring voters to provide photo IDs at the polls did not violate the U.S....

Wendy Lewis went from military service to school and seemed to be lacking one key to success in life outside the Army—structure. Lewis recently participated on a student panel during a Council of State Governments Policy Academy, “Veterans Initiatives: Increasing Educational Attainment.” The goal of the five panels, according to Marshall Thomas, director of Veterans Affairs Services at California State Long Beach and a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, was to discuss how to go beyond simply saying “thank you for your service,” and how to best help veterans achieve educational success.

Education data and workforce data are both important for state workforce development efforts, but Dane Stangler believes getting people to recognize that is difficult. “How do we persuade people, how do we talk to people about why data is important?” Stangler, vice president of research and policy at the Kauffman Foundation, said during a recent CSG policy academy, “Using Education Data to Improve Workforce Development.”

Since 1997, states have been able to bill for Medicaid-enrolled inmates who leave prisons or jails longer than 24 hours for health treatment in a hospital or nursing facility. That provision is an important but little-known exception to the federal prohibition on spending Medicaid funds for health services to inmates of state prisons and local jails, according to Dr. Nicole Jarrett, who spoke at September’s CSG Medicaid Leadership Policy Academy.

By Liam Julian. Felony disenfranchisement laws have a long history in the United States. They first appeared in the colonies in the 1600s as “civil deaths”—vague punishments born from common law, often involving the loss of voting rights and usually meted out for “morality crimes” like drunkenness. These coarse sanctions evolved, though, and between 1776 and 1821, 11 U.S. states codified specific laws limiting voting rights for people convicted of certain crimes. By 1868, when the 14th Amendment, which addresses voting rights, was ratified, 29 of 37 American states specifically withheld the vote from people convicted of felonies.

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