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In Sheehan v. City & County of San Francisco, the Supreme Court will decide whether the Americans with Disabilities Act applies to arrests.

When police officers entered Teresa Sheehan’s room in a group home for people with mental illness, she threatened to kill them with a knife she held, so they retreated. When the officers re-entered her room soon after leaving it, Sheehan stepped toward them with her knife raised and...

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Many congressional leaders have expressed their interest in passing a tax extender bill in the Congressional lame duck session. Around 70 tax credits have expired in 2013 or will expire in 2014. If the president fails to extend these tax credits by Dec. 31, taxpayers will not be able to claim them for the current tax year. These tax extenders represent billions of...

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WASHINGTON, D.C.—While last winter was harsh and this one is expected to be similar, federal grants to states for heating assistance have dropped precipitously.

The grants from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, popularly known as the LIHEAP, help low-income families pay a portion of their home energy needs. Mayors across the U.S. are formally requesting the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to...

Even as the recession abates, working family incomes often cannot cover family expenses and families are reaching out to food banks and community support systems to meet basic needs. These support systems also have struggled under economically stressful times and new creative approaches are needed.

What if a middle-skills job—one that requires more education than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree—could be a ticket to the middle class? It’s possible, experts say, but not enough state policymakers are taking the steps to help ensure the middle can grow. It’s going to take good data, innovative programs and the will to work together, experts say, but growing the middle class can be done.

Following the lead of emergency medical services and doctors, a group of physical therapists and state board administrators are working to develop a licensing compact that would make it easier for physical therapists to practice in multiple states. This type of agreement could significantly increase access to physical therapy services in rural and hard-to-serve areas, which in turn has the potential to reduce costs for patients, states and the federal government. The compact also could allow providers to take advantage of improving technologies and offer more telehealth services.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first case of Ebola in the United States Sept. 30. That patient, a man who had traveled to Texas from Liberia, where he was exposed to the virus, died Oct. 8. Since then, the federal and state governments have worked to develop evidenced-based policies and procedures for the prevention, detection and treatment of the disease. CSG will host an eCademy Tuesday, Dec. 9, featuring Christine Kosmos, director of the CDC’s Division of State and Local Readiness. She will discuss lessons learned about Ebola and states’ responses in the past 60 days.

Clean Air Act regulations continue to roll out with the Environmental Protection Agency’s latest proposed rule coming the day before Thanksgiving. The proposed rule revises the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ground-level ozone from 75 parts per billion, where it has been since 2008, to a range of 65 to 70 parts per billion. The proposed new standard, however, could be tough for many states to meet, said Clint Woods, executive director for the Association of Air Pollution Control Agencies, a membership organization focused on assisting state and local air quality agencies with implementation and technical issues associated with the federal Clean Air Act.

Massachusetts state Sen. Thomas McGee had a cautionary note for attendees at a recent conference in Denver on state transportation funding efforts. “It’s not just about reaching the finish line,” he said at the conference hosted by Transportation for America. “It’s about where you go from there.”

In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Obama called for an increase in the federal minimum wage, from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour. Although Congress did not pass minimum wage legislation in 2014, a number of states have taken action and others likely will address this issue in 2015. The Council of Economic Advisers estimates that from 2013 to 2017, about 7 million workers will benefit from minimum wage increases enacted by state and local governments.1

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