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This act allows active duty service members to cancel and reinstate services like cable, internet, and health club memberships. In order to cancel or reinstate services, a member of the armed services must provide orders proving they have been called into active duty. Qualifying active duty members may be able to reinstate services under the same terms and conditions before cancellation due to active duty call-up.

The growing use of social media in the U.S. has had implications in both the employment and educational contexts. In recent years, some employers and educational institutions have asked current and/or prospective employees or students to grant the employer or school access to social media accounts. From 2012-2014 (as of September 2014), nineteen states enacted varying legislation addressing access of this type (Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin), and numerous additional bills on the topic were introduced.

This act adds physicians, nurses, physical therapists, and physician assistants to a list of mental health professionals required to complete training in suicide assessment, treatment and management every six years. It requires the model list of training programs to be updated periodically, and when practicable, to contain content specific to veterans. It also requires the state to complete a suicide prevention plan.

This act revises the education and orientation requirements for birth centers and their families to incorporate safe sleep practices and causes of Sudden Unexpected Infant Death. It also makes legislative findings with respect to the sudden unexpected death of an infant under a specified age, as well as defines the term “Sudden Unexpected Infant Death”, and includes other provisions relating to training requirements for first responders and health professionals.

This act specifies that any pregnant woman referred for drug abuse or drug dependence treatment at any treatment resource that receives public funding would be a priority user of available treatment. The department of mental health and substance abuse services must ensure that family-oriented drug abuse or drug dependence treatment is available, as appropriations allow. A treatment resource that receives public funds may not refuse to treat a person solely because the person is pregnant as long as appropriate services are offered by the treatment resource.

This act amends Tennessee’s fetal homicide law to allow the prosecution of a pregnant woman for the illegal use of a narcotic drug, if her child is born addicted or harmed by the drugs she took during her pregnancy. The charge of assault is a misdemeanor offense, but if the child is harmed, aggravated assault, with a 15-year maximum prison term, could be charged. That a woman is enrolled in long term drug addiction treatment before the child is born, remains in the program after delivery and successfully completes the program is an affirmative defense under the law. The law is set to expire on July 1, 2016.

Mental Health First Aid Training Act

This act directs the state Department of Human Services to establish and administer the Mental Health First Aid training program so that certified trainers can provide residents, professionals, and members of the public with training on how to identify and assist someone who is believed to be developing or has developed a...

This act expands Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act through the “private option” of policies offered on the state Health Insurance Exchange. The act allows low-income individuals to buy private insurance with Medicaid funding.

This act requires the Executive Office of Health and Human Services to develop evidence-based caregiver assessments and referral tools for family caregivers. Further, a plan of care would be developed which would take into account the needs of the caregiver and the recipient.

According to the United States Department of Labor, “approximately 450,000 people die each year from sudden cardiac arrest in the United States” and “early defibrillation is the only definitive treatment for sudden cardiac arrest” with the best “save” rates occurring when an electric shock is delivered within three minutes of a patient's collapse. Because of the urgency of the situation, the increasing incidence of cardiac arrest in children, and the frequent use of schools as a gathering place for public functions and events for all ages, states have enacted legislation providing for the placement of automated external defibrillators (AED) in schools. Many of the acts are named in memory of a student who died of sudden cardiac arrest following an athletic practice or event at a school.

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