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The states’ current fiscal crisis is due not only to the country’s economic downturn but also to changes in fiscal federalism that have exposed state fiscal systems to the impacts of federal policymaking, economic developments and demographic changes to greater degrees than in the past. Essentially, the states face growing long-term contradictions between escalating spending pressures and eroding tax bases over which states have only limited control. Short-term crisis-management actions, such as cutting spending, increasing taxes, accelerating tax collections, delaying bill payments, expanding gambling and using up reserves, are damaging, stopgap tactics. Long-term solutions will require more fundamental remedial fiscal reform by both the federal government and the states.

Chapter 6 of the 2003 Book of the States contains the following articles and tables:

Chapter 10 of the 2003 Book of the States contains the following articles and tables:

The distribution of federal funds affects a wide array of organizations, individuals and activities throughout the United States economy. Data abound on the size of the overall federal government budget and on spending by federal departments and agencies. However, only one primary source shows not only the agency and program detail, but also the geographic distribution of these funds: the U.S. Bureau of the Census’ Consolidated Federal Funds Report. This article provides details and insights into the make-up and significance of these huge flows of federal funds on state and local areas.

State budget shortfalls are expected to balloon to $82 billion by 2004. What avenues are available for governors to bring about fiscal solvency in the states? This article assesses their plans to navigate this continuing fiscal storm. The author then reviews the state government revenue situation and draws conclusions based on the content of governors’ 2003 state of the state addresses.

Chapter 9 of the 2003 Book of the States contains the following articles and tables:

Chapter 2 of the 2003 Book of the States contains the following articles and tables:

The state fiscal boom of the late 1990s was driven by exceptional forces unlikely to be repeated in the years ahead. The bursting of this fiscal bubble has made the current budget crisis far worse than the relatively mild current economic weakness might suggest. Even after the economy recovers, state finances are likely to be tight for the next several years.

2002 was a major election year for legislatures, with over 85 percent of all seats up for election, resulting in more than 26 percent turnover among legislators in election states. The Republican Party netted more than 175 legislative seats across the country and wound up with more seats than the Democrats for the first time in 50 years. Republicans now hold control of 21 state legislatures, compared to 16 for the Democrats. Twelve legislatures are split between the two parties and Nebraska is nonpartisan.

Chapter 7 of the 2003 Book of the States contains the following articles and tables:

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