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Eight state legislators from around the country, many of them transportation committee chairs or vice chairs in their respective states, attended the 5th Annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy May 11-13, 2015 in Washington, D.C. The academy, which took place during Infrastructure Week, included a tour of transportation projects in Northern Virginia, a keynote address by Maryland Secretary of Transportation Pete Rahn, a luncheon at the D.C. office of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), a standing-room-only briefing for Capitol Hill staffers on the importance of continuing federal transportation investment to state and local officials, a conversation with officials at the U.S. Department of Transportation, a dinner with representatives of two of the largest transportation-related membership associations—the American Road & Transportation Builders Association and the American Public Transportation Association and a briefing on the status of state exploration of mileage-based user fees. Attendees also took part in a transportation policy roundtable with representatives of ASCE, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Transportation for America, the Eno Center for Transportation, the American Trucking Associations and UPS. Finally, the legislators were able to take part in Infrastructure Week activities including Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill. This page includes photos from the three-day academy, the complete agenda for the event and links to web pages where you can read extended excerpts of remarks from many of the speakers.

Delores McQuinn knew her city of Richmond, Va., had challenges with access to healthy foods well before she was elected to Virginia’s House of Delegates in 2008. “This little kid … would come to my house almost every other day to see if we had food for (him) and his siblings," she said. I realized … that there were some serious issues of people having access to food.” The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines a food desert as a census tract with a substantial share of residents who live in low-income areas that have few grocery stores or healthy, affordable food retail outlets.

Economics webcast

In the aftermath of the Great Recession, an increasing number of states, including several in the SLC region, are focused on increasing accountability and transparency in the disbursement of taxpayer dollars. Performance-based budgeting—which focuses on efficiency and effectiveness in outcomes—has emerged as a viable tool for states looking for an alternative to routinely funding government operations on a pro forma basis. This webinar provided an overview of performance-based budgeting and highlighted measures initiated in Oklahoma and Mississippi to implement this spending strategy.

 

As rideshare companies like Uber and Lyft are changing America’s transportation landscape, so too are they impacting state policy as legislators try to address insurance-related issues that have arisen around these services. This free eCademy webcast offered an essential briefing on the emerging insurance-related regulatory and legislative landscape surrounding these services. This eCademy session was part of a collaboration between CSG and The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation to inform state officials on insurance issues, while maintaining a commitment to an unbiased, nonpartisan and academic approach to programming.

 

Sixteen states have passed laws explicitly authorizing needle exchange programs, and there are a number of states with statutes that either decrease barriers to the distribution of clean needles or altogether remove syringes from the list of drug paraphernalia. Additionally, a recent HIV outbreak in the small town of Austin, Ind., has led more states to consider authorizing such programs.

Long-term care and supports were the focus of the 2015 CSG Medicaid Policy Academy, held in Washington, D.C., June 17-19, 2015. The 30 registered CSG members came from 19 states. Home states are marked in purple in the map below. Over the four years CSG has convened the Medicaid Policy Academy, legislators from 42 states have participated. 

The program concluded with a plenary session featuring Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, medical director of the Urban Health Institute at the Cooper University Healthcare as well as the founder and executive director of Camden (N.J.)  Coalition of Healthcare Providers. In 2013, Dr. Brenner was named a MacArthur Fellow for his work on addressing the health care needs of the chronically ill in impoverished neighborhoods. 

Rural communities in the South continue to face serious challenges in getting highly educated students to return home after college graduation. Research indicates that education may be a cause and effect for this rural “brain drain” phenomenon, and also the key to reversing the trend. Studies have shown that efforts to improve rural education contribute to rapid economic development in those areas, while a more educated community can serve as a catalyst for business expansion and increased civic engagement. This complimentary webinar, presented by CSG South/SLC, highlights the impact of education on rural development and examines initiatives in rural communities to entice educated former residents to return and invest in their hometowns.

Forty-eight rural hospitals have closed their doors since 2010, according to data recorded by the North Carolina Rural Health Research Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. The typical rural hospital has 25 to 50 beds. It is more dependent on Medicare and Medicaid, which generally pay less than other insurers, and it has lower patient volume than urban hospitals. “The implication of lower volume is that the hospital is spreading fixed costs over less people and there is less certainty about the numbers of services that will be provided on any given day,” said Mark Holmes, director of the North Carolina Rural Health Research Program. “This uncertainty makes it hard to staff the hospital and hard to plan.”

To paraphrase Mark Twain, “the reports of Rural America’s death are greatly exaggerated.” In fact, at least four major trends are helping improve the future of rural America: broadband, telemedicine, job training and new methods to attract young people to farming all offer hope.

As states across the country continue to transform health care, achieving the balance between cost containment and high quality care remains a primary focus. CSG is pleased to present a FREE eCademy webcast featuring national health care expert Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, who explores strategies to improve the quality of health care delivery while minimizing costs. Brenner is the medical director of the Urban Health Institute at the Cooper University Healthcare as well as the founder and executive director of Camden (N.J.) Coalition of Healthcare Providers. He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013 for his work on addressing the health care needs of the chronically ill in impoverished communities in the U.S. This presentation was broadcast as part of CSG’s 2015 Medicaid Policy Academy in Washington, D.C.

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