Heather Perkins

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The West is running out of water … well, almost. Northwestern and Northcentral Western states are seeing an increase in precipitation and the Southwestern and Southcentral areas are, as expected, experiencing decreased rain. Add to this a temperature increase of five to seven degrees Fahrenheit in key river basins, a lower-than-predicted snowpack—a key feeder of Western water—and you end up with the perfect mixture of short-term events and long-term impacts that are likely to decrease Western stream flow up to 20 percent across several river basins. This session focused on the critical issue of Western water, how states can work and are working together, and what the federal government is doing to assist.

The West is running out of water … well, almost. Northwestern and Northcentral Western states are seeing an increase in precipitation and the Southwestern and Southcentral areas are, as expected, experiencing decreased rain. Add to this a temperature increase of five to seven degrees Fahrenheit in key river basins, a lower-than-predicted snowpack—a key feeder of Western water—and you end up with the perfect mixture of short-term events and long-term impacts that are likely to decrease Western stream flow up to 20 percent across several river basins. This session focused on the critical issue of Western water, how states can work and are working together, and what the federal government is doing to assist.

  

America runs on oil and like it or not, the nation will continue to do so well into the future. While technological and cultural shifts impacting U.S. dependence on oil are steadily gaining ground, the country consumes more than 19 million barrels of oil each day with half coming from imports; Canada and Mexico are two of the U.S.'s largest energy partners. To boost energy security, create jobs and lower the price at the pump for consumers, the U.S. must work with its continental neighbors to maximize North American oil production. This session explored current and future partnerships across the Northern and Southern borders and new ways the three countries are cooperating to ensure a more secure and reliable resource future.

America runs on oil and like it or not, the nation will continue to do so well into the future. While technological and cultural shifts impacting U.S. dependence on oil are steadily gaining ground, the country consumes more than 19 million barrels of oil each day with half coming from imports; Canada and Mexico are two of the U.S.'s largest energy partners. To boost energy security, create jobs and lower the price at the pump for consumers, the U.S. must work with its continental neighbors to maximize North American oil production. This session explored current and future partnerships across the Northern and Southern borders and new ways the three countries are cooperating to ensure a more secure and reliable resource future.

America runs on oil and like it or not, the nation will continue to do so well into the future. While technological and cultural shifts impacting U.S. dependence on oil are steadily gaining ground, the country consumes more than 19 million barrels of oil each day with half coming from imports; Canada and Mexico are two of the U.S.'s largest energy partners. To boost energy security, create jobs and lower the price at the pump for consumers, the U.S. must work with its continental neighbors to maximize North American oil production. This session explored current and future partnerships across the Northern and Southern borders and new ways the three countries are cooperating to ensure a more secure and reliable resource future.

Voters offered up few surprises as they took to the polls Tuesday to elect statewide officials and vote on various ballot propositions. In an election year with a small percentage of seats up for election, ballot propositions and special legislative recall elections took center stage. Seven states had propositions on the ballot Tuesday. Voters in Ohio and Mississippi rejected two measures that garnered plenty of national attention.

Voters in seven states took to the polls on Tuesday to vote on 27 ballot measures. In a year that had very few legislative and executive elections, some of the measures gained media attention over the last several months. The two that were seen as the most controversial, the Mississippi personhood amendment and the Ohio collective bargaining issue, were handily defeated. Below is a summary of the results from all seven states:

Yesterday's legislative and executive branch results did not offer up many suprises.Only three states held regularly scheduled legislative elections, while two state elected governors. Below is a summary of the current results:

The battle for control of a handful of legislative chambers is taking place today even though the overall number of statewide legislative elections is small. Iowa, Mississippi and Virginia all have the chance of one of their chambers switching party control.

The West faces special challenges with water, and not just in the U.S. The pending threat of climate change makes those challenges even more threatening.

That was the message during the session, “Managing Western Water in Evolving Climate Conditions.”

And that’s one reason British Columbia, for one, is considering climate change in any new water agreements it considers, said Glen Davidson, comptroller of Water Rights for province of British Columbia.

“We’re trying to adapt our tools, trying to build...

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