Economics and Finance

The Council of State Governments, in partnership with the National Conference of State Legislators, or NCSL, and the State Exchange on Employment and Disability, or SEED, provided technical assistance to Oregon’s House Workgroup on Workforce Development for People with Disabilities. The workgroup is made up of representatives from Oregon’s House Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee chaired by Rep. Jeff Reardon. Other members include Rep. Gene Whisnant, the vice chair, and Rep. Janeen Sollman.

This month marked the one-year anniversary of the announcement by Amazon that the company would seek a location for a second headquarters somewhere in North America, bringing with it $5 billion in investment and 50,000 jobs. The announcement sparked an intense competition among communities hoping to land HQ2 and resulted in 238 proposals that earlier this year were narrowed down to 20 finalists. With Amazon now expected to announce a winner before the end of the year, it’s time to check in on where things stand with the search, who’s most likely to come out on top and whether we know any more about the criteria the company will use to make their final decision.  

Natural disasters have continued to grow in number, strength and size since weather data has been recorded. Recently, California was subject to the largest wildfire in the state’s history; an estimated 1.2 million acres has already burned, and fire season is far from over. The East Coast and Gulf Coast have seen a stream of hurricanes for the past several years. So far this year, we’ve seen nine hurricanes form in the Atlantic Ocean alone with three making landfall. Many states continue to see flooding worsen as levees grow higher along the Mississippi, drainage infrastructure fails, or record rainfalls strike overnight. Hawaii continues to watch the eruption of Kilauea as well as manage Tropical Storm Olivia.

In March, Florida enacted HB 7087, which creates several one-time tax exemptions related to hurricane response, preparedness and recovery.

On Sept. 19, the U.S. Small Business Administration, or SBA, awarded $18 million in funds to 47 states through the State Trade Expansion Program, or STEP, to help support and increase exporting from small businesses. The STEP grant program has been a vital resource to help states increase the number of companies that export, and thus grow their economies.

Exports from the United States account for nearly 13 percent of the gross domestic product and support millions of direct and in-direct jobs. Moreover, firms that export are more diversified and pay 15-20 percent higher wages on average than their nonexporting competitors.

CSG Midwest
The state of gambling in the Midwest already varies considerably from one jurisdiction to the next.
Want to try your hand at a casino table game? You have no such chance on one side of the Iowa-Nebraska line, where the latter’s constitutional language prevents commercial casinos. Cross the Missouri River from Omaha into the Iowa town of Council Bluffs, though, and three casinos are only minutes away.
How about playing a table-style casino game while at a bar or other local establishment, via a “video gaming terminal”? In Illinois, more than 6,000 locations now have these terminals. For most other states in the region, this type of activity is nonexistent, or at least limited to charitable or tribal gaming.
These state-by-state differences in gambling are the result of a mix of constitutional language, politics and legislative decision-making. These same factors are likely to cause states in the Midwest to take varying approaches to intrastate sports betting. In May, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a federal law that had blocked this type of gambling activity, and a handful of states outside the region already have new laws in place.
In some Midwestern states, the odds seem pretty good that sports betting will be authorized (maybe as early as next year). In others, legalization appears much more of a long shot.
CSG Midwest
The number of people with disabilities working for the state of Minnesota has risen considerably over the past four years, reflecting a concerted effort across agencies to improve outreach, recruitment and hiring practices. The latest state figures show that 7 percent of the workforce has a disability of some kind — the goal set by Gov. Mark Dayton in a 2014 executive order. “We need a state workforce that reflects the diverse populations we serve,” Minnesota Management and Buget Commissioner Myron Frans says.

The issue in Washington State Department of Licensing v. Cougar Den Inc. is whether the “right to travel” provision of the Yakama Nation Treaty preempts Washington’s tax and permit requirements for importing fuel.

Article III of the Yakama Nation Treaty of 1858 states that “the right of way, with free access from the same to the nearest public highway, is secured to [the Yakama]; as also the right, in common with citizens of the United States, to travel upon all public highways.”

Chapter 7 of The Book of the States 2018 contains the following tables:

In Dawson v. Steager the Supreme Court will decide whether states may give some retired state and local government employees a bigger tax break on retirement benefits than retired federal employees.

West Virginia taxes the government-provided retirement income of most local, state, and federal employees. While retired federal employees and most state and local government employees may exempt up to $2,000 of retirement benefits from their taxable income, certain state and local police officers, sheriffs, and firefighters can exempt all of their benefits. This group comprises about two percent of all state government retirees.

By Briana Bell

The National Flood Insurance Program, or NFIP, began in 1968 and has since focused on providing insurance to high-risk flood communities. The program, although intended to mitigate the financial effects of floods, has come under criticism from some who believe the...

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