The CSG Overseas Voting Initiative Working Group consists of 27 members representing 14 states and nine local election jurisdictions. Combined, these states and local jurisdictions transmitted 50.9 percent of the overall number of blank ballots sent to military and overseas voters by U.S. election jurisdictions.

By
Guest

According to the Centers for Disease Control, unintentional poisoning is now the leading cause of injury death for all age groups. This includes overdoses of drugs or chemicals and the mistaken over use of drugs or chemicals by toddlers, teens or adults. Unintentional poisoning has surpassed motor vehicle traffic fatalities as the leading cause of injury death in the U.S. every year since 2008.

During the 2018 National Conference, CSG will release the Stay-at-Work/Return-to-Work (SAT/RTW) Toolkit. The U.S. Department of Labor and the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s State Exchange on Employment and Disability collaborated on the toolkit. It was designed to provide states with policy options, best practices and implementation strategies to aid efforts in increasing employment retention and labor force participation of employees who acquire, or are at risk of developing, work disabilities.

Ballot measures to expand Medicaid eligibility in Idaho, Nebraska and Utah passed in the mid-term elections. Montana voters rejected a measure to continue the expansion in their state.

As we enter election season, it's critical for voters to know the key issues of the day and where their representatives stand on them. That civic duty can be inhibited when the language of a legislative text becomes lengthy, ambiguous or just plain bad.
The complexity of the legal jargon found on voter ballots isn’t a new issue. Just last year, both Ballotpedia and political scientists from Georgia State University (GSU) conducted assessments to analyze just how complicated the average ballot reads. Both parties used the Flesch-Kincaid readability test, which measures how many words are in a sentence and how many syllables are in those words. Both studies found that the average ballot question requires at least some college-level education. Ballotpedia found that the average question required a graduate-level education.