California Assembly Majority Leader Ian Calderon chairs the state’s Select Committee on Youth and California’s Future and is a founding member and co-chair of the Legislative Technology and Innovation Caucus. He believes technology is a key driver for economic development efforts, and the state can help build the technology infrastructure and ensure the future workforce is well equipped for the jobs of tomorrow.

Vermonters whose driver’s licenses have been suspended for failure to pay fines and fees may find a reprieve this fall following the May passage of a bill by the state Legislature. The bill, H. 571, aims to alleviate some of the financial burden that outstanding traffic tickets and resulting license suspensions can pose, particularly for low-income residents in the rural state, where there are few public transit options and people rely on driving to get to work or school.

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established a national program for the safe, permanent disposal of highly radioactive waste.  In 2002, Congress approved a site at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain; however, that project was stalled and defunded in 2010. Consequently, there currently is no disposal facility in the United States for spent fuel rods from 99 operating commercial nuclear reactors across the country. This webinar, the first in a two-part series, explores the status of nuclear waste management in the United States, with a focus on how the lack of a disposal facility affects electricity customers, the communities that are home to nuclear power plants, and the utilities that own and operate the plants. The series will continue with Part 2, Searching for Solutions,” on July 26 at 2 p.m. EDT.

By Theresa Carroll and Lisa McKinney
The job market is gaining ground again after a slow recovery from the Great Recession. The bulk of these new jobs are “good jobs”—high-paying positions the majority of which are full-time, and provide benefits such as health insurance and retirement plans, according to a report from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce.

By Shannon Riess
Information is key whenever a disaster strikes. Lack of information could be detrimental to populations, neighborhoods and local economies. Many of the technological advances in the field of emergency management have been developed in order to solve the information problem and increase situational awareness. Data allows emergency managers to create a common operating picture that can help the state to predict and mitigate against the impacts of disasters, identify at-risk populations and respond to those areas in need, and recover from the effects of a disaster when a threat has passed. Information systems and emergency management specific software have led states to carry out their missions faster, better and more cost efficiently.