Transportation Funding & Performance in the MAP-21 Era

 
CSG Transportation Public Policy Committee
September 20, 2013
 
The passage of MAP-21, the federal surface transportation authorization bill, in 2012 brought with it a host of policy changes but little in the way of long-term funding security for states trying to meet their growing infrastructure needs. Perhaps partially in reaction, an unprecedented number of states—including Missouri—explored new transportation revenue options in 2013. Meanwhile, bridge collapses earlier this year in Washington state and Missouri once again brought into sharp focus what’s at stake in finding new funding to fix old facilities. This session explored how Missouri is hoping to shape its transportation future, how a new emphasis on performance measurement under MAP-21 will impact states and how the state of the nation’s aging infrastructure makes it a critical time for transportation policy.
 
Presentation by Mara Campbell, Customer Relations Director, Missouri Department of Transportation
 
 

Mara Campbell
Mara Campbell is the customer relations director for the Missouri Department of Transportation, a position she assumed in June 2011. The customer relations division serves a dual role for the agency overseeing its communication and organizational performance efforts. This includes developing strategic approaches to improve performance at all levels and communicate key messages inside and outside the department. Her division has produced a wide variety of award winning projects from communicating the largest design-build project in the state’s history to implementing an organization-wide performance management system.    

Campbell has been employed with the department for sixteen years and has extensive experience in communication, marketing, performance measurement and process reengineering. She is a certified Quality Manager and represents MoDOT on the Missouri Interagency Planning Council, AASHTO’s Standing Committee on Performance Management, and chairs the Transportation Research Board’s Strategic Management Committee. She and her husband, Carter, have one son, and three daughters.