State Strategies to End Child Poverty as a Barrier to Educational Success

A recent report by Educational Testing Service found poor children completed two fewer years of school, earned less than half as much money, worked 451 fewer hours per year, received $826 per year more in food stamps and were nearly three times as likely to have poor health compared to children whose families had incomes of at least twice the poverty level during their early childhood. Poor males were twice as likely to get arrested and poor females were five times more likely to have a child out of wedlock. Among the world’s 35 richest countries, the United States ranks second highest in the rate of child poverty. Achievement gaps between the poor and the non-poor are twice as large as the achievement gap between black and white students. A review of the cognitive performance of toddlers, elementary and middle school students, and college-bound seniors shows extensive variance by income and poverty status. These differences likely contribute to accessibility to and success in college, limiting economic and social mobility and fueling the gap between rich and poor. This webinar, presented by CSG's State Pathways to Prosperity Initiative, showcased ways state policymakers can utilize their role to reduce the impact of child poverty on educational success. 

State Strategies to End Child Poverty as a Barrier to Educational Success
Presented by CSG's State Pathways to Prosperity Initiative

 

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