Project ECHO: Building Specialty-Care Capacity Among Primary Care Providers in Rural and Underserved Areas

Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.

2013 National Conference

CSG Health Policy Academy
Reducing the Bill for Chronic Diseases
September 18-19, 2013

Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.

Presentation by Bruce B. Struminger, M.D., Medical Officer, Indian Health Services, Four Corners, New Mexico and Project ECHO

Project ECHO: Building Specialty-Care Capacity Among Primary Care Providers in Rural and Underserved Areas

Bruce Struminger, M.D.

Bruce Struminger, MD, MA is a practicing Internal Medicine and Public Health physician (MD, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine 1998) with the Indian Health Service/Navajo Service Area in Red Mesa, AZ and a medical anthropologist (MA, Harvard University, in Social/Medical Anthropology 1999). He has taught courses in Medical Anthropology and the Social Studies of Science at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, the University of Michigan, and with the University of New Mexico Honors Program. His recent and current research focuses on the individual and cultural interpretations of the health effects of uranium mining in South Africa, Namibia, and on the Navajo Indian Reservation; issues related to addressing the global HIV and TB epidemics; and implementation science related to strengthening community health on the Navajo Reservation.