Workforce Development

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CSG, in partnership with the National Conference of State Legislatures and the National Governor’s Association, released the National Occupational Licensing Database to help state leaders better understand the national licensing landscape. This database contains information on the criteria required to attain a license in 34 occupations with 18 requirements being assessed. Some of the data points include initial and continuing education requirements, training, experience, exams and fees. Additionally, if a certain occupation is selected, a map of the states that require licensure will be produced (See top image below for map produced when searching the database for information on electricians). The database also allows for the user to make comparisons between states and occupations (See bottom image below for an excerpt of search results from the database when selecting to show information on cosmetologists).

For state officials, knowing what lies around the corner is half the challenge, and the CSG Policy & Research team is committed to providing key insights and analysis on emerging issues across the policy spectrum to state officials. Each year, CSG policy experts take a look at the top issues facing states in education, energy and environment, fiscal and economic development, federal affairs, health, international affairs, interstate compacts, transportation and infrastructure, and workforce development.

Here’s a look at the most important topics on states’ workforce development agendas in 2018.

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During CSG’s 2017 National Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, state leaders asked Deputy Assistant Secretary of Elementary and Secondary Education Jason Botel what skills has the Department of Defense identified new recruits lack that states could consider addressing in their K-12 school systems.

DOD and the Department of Education’s Military Affairs team provide a comprehensive answer to what our federal partners have identified K-12 students need to be military ready when they graduate.

Issue: Factors like the decline of brick-and-mortar retail and rise of e-commerce in recent years have produced a transformation of the nation’s supply chain that is impacting multiple modes of transportation from trucking to rail to ports and airports. Those states that have been most successful in attracting elements of the new logistics economy have demonstrated the ability to tout key infrastructure assets, invest where necessary and enact programs to ensure they will have the workforce in place to serve this sector. As innovative companies like Amazon continue to expand their footprint in the years ahead, these efforts are likely to become even more important for those logistics leaders and the other states that hope to compete with them.  

WHEREAS, the availability of a highly skilled workforce is necessary to support growth and innovation in industries such as manufacturing, health care, telecommunications, biotechnology, information technology, energy, and transportation and logistics; and

WHEREAS, the nation’s industries face challenges to attract new and more diverse talent pools, replace a long serving and experienced workforce, and close gaps in workers’ skills and credentials; and

According to a report conducted in 2016 by the Learning Policy Institute (LPI), many states are facing a growing teacher shortage. The report states that between 2009 and 2014, teacher education enrollment dropped by 35%. Beyond a shortage in the supply of newly educated teachers, the Learning Policy Institute attributes a large part of the shortage to high levels of attrition. U.S. attrition levels are...

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee in July signed into law one of the nation’s most comprehensive paid family leave programs, offering workers paid time off for the birth or adoption of a child or for the serious medical condition of the employee or his or her family member. The legislation, which will take effect in 2020, offers eligible workers 12 weeks of either parental or medical leave, or 16 weeks for a combination of both. Only four other states guarantee paid family leave: California, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island, with New York’s program beginning in 2018. The District of Columbia also approved a paid family leave program this year to take effect in 2020.

By Katherine Barrett and Richard Greene
During the years when the baby-boom generation was being introduced to the population of the United States, the fertility rate equaled about three births for each woman of child bearing age. But since the mid-1960s, when the baby boom ceased, fertility rates have been dropping. By the early 1970s, the fertility rate fell below two births per woman, and it has been declining steadily for at least the last 10 years. Since then, the U.S. fertility rate has been below replacement level—the level that is needed for couples to replace themselves in the population—according to the Population Reference Bureau.

On Wednesday, Sept. 27, the Kentucky work matters task force held its monthly meeting at the Kenton County Detention Center, or KCDC, in Covington. The visit included a tour of the drug rehabilitation program, featured in the New York Times for its breakthroughs in combating both addiction and incarceration issues in Kentucky.

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States are re-engineering their workforce development systems because of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).  One of the primary workforce system challenges is that too many adults lack the skills or credentials required for in-demand jobs.   Of those who lack the skills for in-demand jobs, many do not know how to access information and training needed for the in-demand jobs.   The second major challenge is to prepare students to be college and career ready.  A 2015 survey found that that 78% of college faculty and 62% of employers believe that public high schools are not doing enough to prepare students for the expectations they will face in college and the working world.  In addition, it is estimated that by 2020, 65 percent of all jobs will require some form of postsecondary education or training.    WIOA provides the framework and direction to state governments to realign their workforce and educations systems to meet these challenges.
 
WIOA core programs include the federally funded adult, dislocated worker and youth services programs, the Wagner-Peyser program, adult education and literacy programs and rehabilitation services programs.  States are developing strategic plans for these programs and implementing WIOA through new programs and extensive collaboration between departments of workforce development, education, labor, human services and the state and local workforce development boards. This research brief reviews critical state strategies for implementing WIOA and is part three of a three-part series providing an overview of WIOA. 

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