state laws

CSG Midwest
Starting on Jan. 1, nearly all Illinois residents became eligible to invest in businesses in the state looking to raise capital. The reason: recently enacted legislation (HB 3429) that provides an exemption for nonaccredited investors to participate in intrastate “equity crowdfunding.”
CSG Midwest
An Illinois law that sets guidelines for how police use body cameras and establishes new training and reporting requirements for law enforcement took effect in January. These statutory changes do not require the use of body cameras, but they do establish new statewide protocols. For example, the devices must be turned on at all times when an officer responds to a call or is engaged in other law enforcement activities. (Crime victims or witnesses can ask that the cameras be turned off.) New rules on the disclosure and retention of the cameras’ recordings are also now in place.
CSG Midwest
A nationwide legislative push to give terminally ill patients easier access to experimental medications has succeeded in changing the laws of six Midwestern states over the past two years. In this region, the trend began in late 2014 in Michigan, with bipartisan passage and the governor’s signing of SB 991 and HB 5649. This past year, “right to try” laws were enacted in Illinois (HB 1335), Indiana (HB 1065), Minnesota (SF 100), North Dakota (SB 2259) and South Dakota (HB 1080).
CSG Midwest
In response to concerns raised by family members about the care and safety of their loved ones in nursing homes, Illinois has become one of the first U.S. states to allow the use of cameras in resident rooms. HB 2462, signed into law in 2015, took effect in January.
CSG Midwest
In 2015, more than 1 million people in the 11-state Midwest were living with Alzheimer’s disease — the sixth-leading cause of death among adults in the United States. And minus a cure, this common form of dementia will touch and take even more lives in the decades ahead.
In most of the region’s states, for example, the number of Alzheimer’s cases is expected to increase by close to 20 percent or more between now and 2025 due to rises in the number of people 65 or older (see table). By the middle of this century, the number of Americans with the disease could triple.

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