Capitol Research

Sales of electric vehicles have risen dramatically in recent years. From advantages such as increased fuel economy and energy security, to tax incentives for consumers and emissions reductions, electric vehicles offer a host of benefits. While the federal government offers incentives and other programs relating to electric vehicles, states, both individually and collaboratively, are developing their own policies in relation to these new vehicle technologies.

On Dec. 19, 2014, President Obama signed into law the Stephen Beck Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience, or ABLE, Act, that allows persons with disabilities to save for their futures through tax-advantaged savings accounts. The act gives qualified Americans with disabilities the chance to save money and meet the added expenses of living with a disability without jeopardizing their eligibility for important supports such as Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, and Medicaid.

Efforts around the country to revitalize downtowns and create economically vital and aesthetically pleasing communities, often centered on transit hubs, have created a greater need for a private-public entity that can manage these areas to ensure their long-term sustainability. While most states have laws on the books to enable these special districts, some experts say they are still too difficult to establish and that some of the decades-old laws may need to evolve to reflect the expanding mission of these districts and the changing nature of the communities they serve.

In 2014, overdose deaths numbered 47,055, approximately one and a half times as many deaths as from motor vehicle crashes, according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in December 2015. For the nation, the 2014 death rate from drug overdoses is significantly higher than the rate in 2013 and since 2000 has more than doubled.

In September, the U.S. Census Bureau released the highly anticipated Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2014 report and the Income and Poverty in the United States: 2014 report. The Census Bureau’s annual survey of health insurance coverage found that significantly fewer American adults remained without health insurance in 2014 compared to the year before.