Capitol Research

Medicaid provides health insurance to more than 70 million Americans who fall within one of four main categories: infants and children; pregnant women, parents and other nonelderly adults; individuals of all ages with disabilities; and very low-income seniors.1 Prior to the passing of the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, in 2010, most low-income adults were not able to qualify for Medicaid because federal law excluded adults without dependent children from the program. Additionally, income eligibility for most parents was extremely limited in most states.2

Charter schools are publicly funded schools that are operated by nongovernmental boards or organiza- tions, which can be nonprofit or for-profit, and are in a short-term contract with the state or state designated authorizer. The state or designated authorizer sets performance and operating standards, which must be periodically evaluated.

Currently, 44 states have authorized charter schools. Of those that have charter schools, 24 states have explicitly defined or permitted cybercharter schools. Cybercharter schools provide either all or the majority of their instruction online.

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, also known as WIOA, received bipartisan congressional support and was signed into law in July 2014. WIOA is the first major reform of the public workforce system since the Workforce Investment Act, or WIA, of 1998. The program has an ambitious goal to coordinate up to 19 different federal programs administered by four different federal departments.

Prevailing wage laws are laws created by state governments or local municipalities to set a rate of pay that is thought to be standard for a labor group contracted to do public-sector projects in that area. The standard rate of pay is oftentimes determined by analyzing local wage data and identifying the median or average rate of pay for a labor group or project.Twenty-nine states currently have prevailing wage laws.

In 2016, The Council of State Governments and the National Conference of State Legislatures assembled a national task force to focus on workforce development efforts targeting people with disabilities in the states. This task force had four subcommittees composed of state policymakers along with non-voting stakeholders from the private sector and academia. The third in a four-part series that coincides with the subcommittee topics, this CSG Capitol Research brief highlights the recommendations from the Hiring, Retention and Reentry, or HRR, Subcommittee of the National Task Force on Workforce Development and Employability for People with Disabilities.

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