Capitol Research

The federal reimbursement rate in 2016 is 54 cents per mile, down 3.5 cents per mile from the 2015 rate but up 9.5 cents over the rate 10 years before–44.5 cents per mile on Jan. 1, 2006. Thirty-four states have a reimbursement rate that is the same as the federal rate. For those 16 states whose rates differ from the federal rate, reimbursement rates range from 31 cents to 52 cents per mile. No state reimburses at a rate higher than the federal rate.

  Download the Brief in PDF / E-Reader Compatible Format

There are multiple challenges to the question of child care in the states. Early childhood education can be viewed through multiple policy area lenses, including workforce development, education, health care and economic development. What is at stake for families with young children needing child care?

  Download the Brief in PDF / E-Reader Compatible Format

The fourth of a five-part series on child care as a public policy question, this CSG research brief highlights child care quality in the states, including initiatives to mea- sure and improve quality, and the development of a skilled early childhood education workforce. The prior three briefs in this series explored demographics of families with small children, affordability and access.

This is the third installment of a series of research briefs focusing on child care in the United States. The first brief provided an overview of child care, including what families with children look like today. The second brief explored the affordability of child care. This brief focuses on questions about the availability and access American families have to child care from state to state. How can families choose which setting is best for their child? How many slots are available per child in a state, and how many child care workers are there?

  Download the Brief in PDF / E-Reader Compatible Format

Child care is a major expense for most families across the country. Federal, state and local governments recognize the financial burden that child care places on parents, offering subsidies to those hardest hit— low-income families. This research brief is the second in a five-part series about the state of child care and its implications. In the first brief, we introduced child care as a state policy area, the demographics of families with young children, and the federal legislative landscape for improving the quality of child care and subsidizing costs.

Pages