Capitol Comments

On Tuesday, February 13, one day after The White House released details of President Trump’s long-awaited infrastructure plan, the co-chair of the CSG Transportation & Infrastructure Public Policy Committee, Rep. Andrew McLean of Gorham, Maine, traveled to Washington, DC. He participated in a panel discussion at the U.S. Capitol on the continuing importance of the federal-state-local partnership on infrastructure and met with Maine’s U.S. Senators, Susan Collins and Angus King. Below are highlights and photos from the day’s events.

I have an article in this week’s issue of The Current State looking at Kentucky’s quest for additional revenues to fund transportation in the future. That makes it as good a time as any to check in on some of my other states to watch in 2018 on transportation funding.

President Trump’s State of the Union speech and a leaked outline of his infrastructure package last month produced no shortage of opinions about what the administration has in mind for one of his major policy priorities. Many from across the transportation and public policy communities and from across the political spectrum have expressed serious concerns about the shape the package may be taking. Here’s a roundup of some of the reaction so far.

CSG Director of Transportation and Infrastructure Policy Sean Slone outlines the top five issues in transportation and infrastructure policy for 2018, including the growing logistics economy, the federal role in transportation, states seeking transportation funding solutions, the precarious condition of U.S. infrastructure and the policy implications of emerging transportation technologies. Links included to CSG’s expanded coverage and further reading on each issue.

Issue: In 2017, 12 states approved self-driving vehicle-related legislation including measures to allow truck platooning, identify an agency to oversee testing and preempt local regulation. As the year wound down, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released a streamlined version of policy guidance on automated driving systems and Congress was debating federal legislation that could preempt state authority in some areas. The growing use of drones in a variety of capacities also attracted the interest of states with 23 pieces of legislation enacted in 17 states. Federal drone legislation was also considered in conjunction with a reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration, but Congress ultimately approved just a six-month FAA extension that did not include drone language.

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