2014 CSG National Conference

The 2009 Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act aims to ensure U.S. military personnel, their dependents and other U.S. citizens living overseas have sufficient time to request and receive ballots and states allow enough time for the ballots to be counted. Significant progress has been made, but more improvements are needed. In this session, key stakeholders shared their perspectives in working to enhance voting for overseas Americans and discussed the need for state-level policy improvements.

With the new proposed rules by the United States Environmental Protection Agency related to section 111 (d) of the Clean Air Act, many states have questions about what the rule means for their state. The session addressed the questions state leaders need to ask to have a better understanding of how the rule affects their state’s businesses, citizens and energy future.

Public education in the U.S. was established with a vitally important civic mission—to prepare each generation for informed and engaged citizenship. As part of CSG’s ongoing work exploring the history and current challenges of federalism, this session took a step back and explored how we are teaching future generations about government and civic participation.

America’s economic engine is fueled by intellectual property rights, which drive innovation and protect consumers. Innovative and creative companies perform better and contribute more to local economies than their counterparts. The direct and indirect economic impacts account for more than 40 percent of U.S. economic growth and employment, 40 million American jobs, 30 percent higher wages and 74 percent of total exports. This session highlighted the latest developments in intellectual property and how they affect your state.

The CSG West Canada Relations Committee discussed the Arctic Council and its importance to both the U.S. and Canada. Members also discussed how states and provinces play a role in mitigating the effects of climate change, as well as in emergencies such as fires and floods, independently and collaboratively through memorandums of understanding and compacts.

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