Policy Area

State governments are examining the prospect of interlocal shared service initiatives as a means of reducing service delivery costs and providing tax relief, as well as streamlining local services, eliminating duplicative services, and enhancing governmental responsiveness and transparency. In an effort to effectively encourage the development and implementation of shared services, states should: provide financial support or incentives; collect and disseminate concrete information regarding the benefits of shared service initiatives; establish shared service performance measures; develop a central point of information to field questions from communities who are in the process of developing, implementing, or sustaining shared services; and work to ensure that the long-term interests of the taxpayers are paramount.

CSG South

This report was prepared for The Council of State Governments Financial Services Working Group by Dwight V. Denison, Merl M. Hackbart, Juita-Eleana (Wie) Yusuf, and Jay H. Song of the University of Kentucky's Martin School for Public Policy and Administration.

Rapidly expanding proportions of retail- and business-related payments, traditionally made by cash and check, are now being made electronically through Automated Clearing House (ACH) or using credit or debit cards. Increasingly, the shift to electronic payments is also occurring in the public sector. The principal purpose of this study was to determine current state government acceptance and use of electronic tax and fee payments. Related purposes included an analysis of policies and procedures implemented by the states to more effectively facilitate and manage electronic payment processes.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

CSG South

In recent years, the largest and fastest growing number of incarcerated inmates over the age of 50 in United States’ prisons has continued to shape the demographic of prison systems throughout the country. The perpetual explosion of elderly persons in the general American population, and the repercussions of the “tough-on-crime” laws during the 1980s and 1990s, have led to a current increase of approximately 675,000 arrests of elderly persons every year in the United States. Experts assert that this is not attributable to an elderly crime wave, but rather to several factors that will continue to put more elderly people behind bars and continue to keep these persons behind bars longer.

The SLC began closely examining this issue during the 1990s. From information gathered from state corrections department through 1997, the SLC published a report, The Aging Inmate Population, on the topic in 1998, noting that many states “have found that the increase in the geriatric inmate population has been far greater than anticipated.” As an update to the 1998 report, this SLC Regional Resource explores the increase of the elderly prison population in Southern states and the nuances of this development, focusing particularly on changes since 1997. It examines policies and procedures employed by each state, as well as facilities and programs that are geared toward accommodating this growing population. Also, this report addresses the concerns of corrections officials regarding the future of the elderly inmate population within their states. Information was gathered through polling corrections departments in the 16 SLC member states. In addition, information was amassed from existing research projects and studies.

CSG South

This presentation by Sujit M. CanagaRetna, Fiscal Policy Manager at the Southern Legislative Conference (SLC), was given as Testimony Before a Hearing of the Georgia Senate Grassroots Arts Program Study Committee at the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia on November 20, 2006.

The economic impact of the arts is an issue that the SLC has been studying for well over two decades now. The SLC’s ongoing review of this topic and publications is a reflection of the recognition of its importance to SLC economies and public officials in the South. As demonstrated in these reports, a relatively miniscule investment in the arts results in substantially larger financial returns alongside many other benefits. The presentation summarizes a report completed earlier this year, entitled From Blues to Benton to Bluegrass: the Economic Impact of the Arts in the South, the most recent SLC report focusing on the arts in 16 Southern states.

CSG South

This presentation was given by Sujit M. CanagaRetna, Fiscal Policy Manager at the Southern Legislative Conference (SLC), before the SLC Fall Legislative Issues Conference in Savannah, Georgia, November 12, 2006. It deals with a topic that has enormous implications for state finances: under-funded and unfunded state pensions.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

Pages