Tolls

The 2018 CSG National Conference in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati in December featured a day-long policy academy on “The Intersection of Innovation and Infrastructure.” The event included policy discussions on autonomous and connected vehicles and truck platooning, state strategies for advancing the electric vehicle marketplace, ride-hailing and mobility innovations, how to enable the technology underpinning infrastructure innovation and the infrastructure investments and policy changes needed to drive innovation forward. In addition, Michael Stevens, chief innovation officer for the city of Columbus, Ohio, gave a keynote address about the city’s multi-million-dollar smart city initiative. Here’s a summary of what took place along with select comments from the day’s speakers. Below you’ll also find a variety of links to articles and reports that drive the conversation forward on many of these topics.

With new governors in many states pushing infrastructure investment as a priority and some states seeking new solutions following the failure of statewide ballot measures in November, 2019 could be a big year for transportation funding. If that happens, it would follow the recent trend of significant activity on the funding front during odd-number years. Here’s a look at some of the states most likely to pursue new funding this year.

From a gas tax repeal in California to a proposed gas tax increase in Missouri and from a lockbox amendment in Connecticut to dueling bonding proposals in Colorado, state ballots this November will include a variety of measures that could have a profound impact on the future of transportation around the country. Transportation is also being raised as an issue in many of the nation’s gubernatorial contests this year. Here’s a roundup of some of the transportation policy-related choices voters will face on Election Day and links to where you can read more.

While a comprehensive infrastructure bill may not be in the cards for 2018, that doesn’t mean infrastructure won’t factor into this year’s Congressional agenda. It also didn’t mean Infrastructure Week (May 14-21) was completely devoid of infrastructure-related news. Far from it. Here’s a roundup of some of the infrastructure news from the last couple of weeks.

With many legislatures wrapping up sessions this month or already adjourned sine die, it seems like a good time to check in on efforts to seek additional transportation revenues. This year appears to be holding true to form as an even-number election year when votes for gas tax increases and other measures are a bit harder to come by. Still, some states have experienced limited success in moving measures while others remain hopeful for action this year on the transportation funding front.

A variety of states are taking steps this year to consider tolling as they seek to generate revenues for transportation, relieve congestion and perhaps qualify for federal transportation funding, which could be more difficult to come by in the future. I have updates on expanded tolling legislation in Utah, tolling studies in Iowa and Minnesota and the failure of a congestion pricing plan in New York. Plus, details on how to attend one of the nation’s premier conferences on public-private partnerships this June.

Since last week’s release of details of President Trump’s long-awaited infrastructure plan and his proposed FY 2019 budget, reaction has been rolling in. Here’s a primer on where to read more about the President’s overall approach to infrastructure and various aspects of the plan getting attention, as well as what various stakeholder groups and analysts are saying.

I have an article in this week’s issue of The Current State looking at Kentucky’s quest for additional revenues to fund transportation in the future. That makes it as good a time as any to check in on some of my other states to watch in 2018 on transportation funding.

President Trump’s State of the Union speech and a leaked outline of his infrastructure package last month produced no shortage of opinions about what the administration has in mind for one of his major policy priorities. Many from across the transportation and public policy communities and from across the political spectrum have expressed serious concerns about the shape the package may be taking. Here’s a roundup of some of the reaction so far.

Issue: Seven states (CA, IN, MT, OR, SC, TN and WV) raised gas taxes in 2017 while Utah modified its gas tax formula to allow for more robust revenue growth. Other states including Colorado, Idaho, New Hampshire, Utah and Wisconsin approved one-time transportation funding. Wyoming, which raised its gas tax in 2013, increased vehicle registration and other fees. Ten states approved new fees for electric and/or hybrid vehicles in 2017. Meanwhile states like California, Oregon and Washington continued their experiments with mileage-based user fees, which some believe could one day replace gas taxes. Will 2018, an election year in most places, continue to see state activity on the state funding front and how will a change in philosophy from Washington influence states?

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