Authorization

For those not off to Grandmother’s house just yet, here are a few recent transportation-related stories, links and reports for your post-tryptophan coma reading pleasure. There are items on surface transportation authorization, traffic congestion, the economic impact of infrastructure investment and transportation finance.

The U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Wednesday voted unanimously to move forward a bipartisan transportation authorization bill known by the acronym MAP-21. In the latest issue of CSG’s Capitol Ideas E-Newsletter I look at why there may still be a long road ahead before legislation is signed into law. Here is some additional analysis of the bill and its prospects. I also have updates on the potential for a gas tax increase in Iowa and the future of tolling in Washington State.

The U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee took up bipartisan legislation this week to reauthorize federal surface transportation programs for two years and make major reforms to ensure greater efficiency. 

In October 2011, CSG hosted an invitation-only Transportation Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. for a group of 11 state legislators from around the country, many of whom serve in leadership positions on transportation-focused committees in their states. In addition to providing an opportunity for these state leaders to meet with their members of Congress about the future of transportation policy, CSG also invited a group of policy experts, public officials, advocates and observers to speak to the group about the policy landscape, what may lie ahead for states in transportation and what some states are doing in the absence of federal action. In the interest of sharing their insights and expertise with a broader CSG audience, this series of blog posts features extended excerpts from their remarks on a wide variety of transportation policy issues.

CSG Transportation Policy Academy, October 4-6, 2011, Washington, DC

From L to R: Sen. Frank LaRose (OH), Rep. Ed Soliday (IN), Rep. Dan Beiser (IL), Rep. Alice Hausman (MN), Sen. Bill Sample (AR), Rep. Hubert Collins (KY), Sen. James Hammond (ID), Rep. Bob Godfrey (CT). Also attending the academy but not pictured: Rep. Helene Keeley (DE), Sen. Thomas McGee (MA), Sen. Robert Beach (WV).

In October 2011, CSG hosted an invitation-only Transportation Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. for a group of 11 state legislators from around the country, many of whom serve in leadership positions on transportation-focused committees in their states. In addition to providing an opportunity for these state leaders to meet with their members of Congress about the future of transportation policy, CSG also invited a group of policy experts, public officials, advocates and observers to speak to the group about the policy landscape, what may lie ahead for states in transportation and what some states are doing in the absence of federal action. In the interest of sharing their insights and expertise with a broader CSG audience, this series of blog posts will feature extended excerpts from their remarks on a wide variety of transportation policy issues. James Corless is the Director of Transportation for America, a coalition of over 400 organizations working to promote a new national transportation policy. During his remarks to policy academy participants, Corless discussed the uncertainty surrounding the future of the federal transportation program, the need to focus on performance measurement and system improvement and how the federal role in transportation is likely to change going forward.

In October 2011, CSG hosted an invitation-only Transportation Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. for a group of 11 state legislators from around the country, many of whom serve in leadership positions on transportation-focused committees in their states. In addition to providing an opportunity for these state leaders to meet with their members of Congress about the future of transportation policy, CSG also invited a group of policy experts, public officials, advocates and observers to speak to the group about the policy landscape, what may lie ahead for states in transportation and what some states are doing in the absence of federal action. In the interest of sharing their insights and expertise with a broader CSG audience, this series of blog posts will feature extended excerpts from their remarks on a wide variety of transportation policy issues. Joshua Schank is President and CEO of the Eno Transportation Foundation, a non-profit foundation with the mission of improving transportation policy and leadership. During his remarks to policy academy participants, he discussed the legacy of 2005’s SAFETEA-LU legislation authorizing federal surface transportation programs, the need for a new focus and reasons for optimism about the current debate over a SAFETEA-LU successor.

In October 2011, CSG hosted an invitation-only Transportation Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. for a group of 11 state legislators from around the country, many of whom serve in leadership positions on transportation-focused committees in their states. In addition to providing an opportunity for these state leaders to meet with their members of Congress about the future of transportation policy, CSG also invited a group of policy experts, public officials, advocates and observers to speak to the group about the policy landscape, what may lie ahead for states in transportation and what some states are doing in the absence of federal action. In the interest of sharing their insights and expertise with a broader CSG audience, this series of blog posts will feature extended excerpts from their remarks on a wide variety of transportation policy issues. Emil Frankel is the Director of Transportation Policy for the Bipartisan Policy Center and an independent consultant on transportation policy and public management issues. During his remarks to policy academy participants, Frankel discussed the politicization of transportation policy, the future of transportation funding and why the federal program is ripe for reform.

In October 2011, CSG hosted an invitation-only Transportation Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. for a group of 11 state legislators from around the country, many of whom serve in leadership positions on transportation-focused committees in their states. In addition to providing an opportunity for these state leaders to meet with their members of Congress about the future of transportation policy, CSG also invited a group of policy experts, public officials, advocates and observers to speak to the group about the policy landscape, what may lie ahead for states in transportation and what some states are doing in the absence of federal action. In the interest of sharing their insights and expertise with a broader CSG audience, this series of blog posts will feature extended excerpts from their remarks on a wide variety of transportation policy issues. Jim Kolb is the Democratic Staff Director for the U.S. House Subcommittee on Highways and Transit. In his remarks to policy academy participants, Kolb discussed how the political sea change in 2010 has lowered the expectations for a new federal surface transportation bill, the current House and Senate proposals, the future of the federal gas tax and the federal role in transportation.

In October 2011, CSG hosted an invitation-only Transportation Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. for a group of 11 state legislators from around the country, many of whom serve in leadership positions on transportation-focused committees in their states. In addition to providing an opportunity for these state leaders to meet with their members of Congress about the future of transportation policy, CSG also invited a group of policy experts, public officials, advocates and observers to speak to the group about the policy landscape, what may lie ahead for states in transportation and what some states are doing in the absence of federal action. In the interest of sharing their insights and expertise with a broader CSG audience, this series of blog posts will feature extended excerpts from their remarks on a wide variety of transportation policy issues. Janet Kavinoky is the Executive Director for Transportation and Infrastructure at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. In her remarks to policy academy participants, Kavinoky discussed the relationship between infrastructure and economic performance, the focus of the federal transportation program, the future of transportation funding, and America’s intermodal needs.

In October 2011, CSG hosted an invitation-only Transportation Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. for a group of 11 state legislators from around the country, many of whom serve in leadership positions on transportation-focused committees in their states. In addition to providing an opportunity for these state leaders to meet with their members of Congress about the future of transportation policy, CSG also invited a group of policy experts, public officials, advocates and observers to speak to the group about the policy landscape, what may lie ahead for states in transportation and what some states are doing in the absence of federal action. In the interest of sharing their insights and expertise with a broader CSG audience, this series of blog posts will feature extended excerpts from their remarks on a wide variety of transportation policy issues. Jack Basso is the Director of Program Finance and Management at the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) in Washington, DC. In his remarks to policy academy participants, Basso spoke about the status of federal surface transportation legislation, proposals from Congress and the Obama Administration and potential options for funding transportation going forward.

Pages