Transportation

A gas tax increase appears on the fast track to final passage in Iowa. Transportation funding measures in Georgia and Washington also moved forward this week. And governors, state DOT officials and legislators in a variety of other states introduced or defended major transportation packages as the funding conversation heated up in those states. Here’s a roundup of the latest developments.

Several states appear poised to tackle transportation funding during the 2015 legislative sessions. During this eCademy, CSG takes you around the country to get progress reports on funding initiatives from state house reporters, legislators and others following the activity. James Corless of the Washington, D.C.-based advocacy organization Transportation for America also provides a perspective on the latest revenue mechanism trends and a rundown of resources available to policymakers.

 

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This week, an update on more than 20 states looking at transportation funding this year. Per-gallon gas tax increases, indexing, sales taxes, tax swaps, motor vehicle excise taxes, vehicle registration fees, transportation fund lockboxes and bonding are among the issues factoring into the discussions around the country. I also have information about how you can join us for our latest eCademy webinar this week on the states to watch on transportation funding.

We got a look this week at the Obama administration’s vision for transportation with the release of the President’s budget and authorization proposal and a new report looking at trends impacting the nation’s transportation system and the implications of those trends over the next 30 years. Meanwhile, Congress has begun looking at options for how to fund a longer term transportation bill with the debate appearing to coalesce around three possibilities. Nevertheless, state officials around the country remain concerned about the impact ongoing federal uncertainty is having on their ability to plan for the all-important transportation project construction season.

The continuing evolution of public-private partnerships (P3s) and tolling was another of the issues on my recent Top 5 Transportation Issues for 2015. There have already been a variety of developments this year on some key stories concerning both, including a debate in Kentucky over how to finance a new bridge over the Ohio River, efforts to convince the new Governor of Maryland of the benefits of two light rail P3 projects and a new infrastructure financing tool to encourage private investment proposed by President Obama. Here are a few updates from around the country and links where you can read more.

According to the AAA Fuel Gauge Report, average gas prices in January 2015 are at the lowest point in over 5 years and are on track to dip below $2 a gallon by February 2015. Missouri has the lowest average gas price of any state at $1.77 per gallon while Alaska ($2.81) and Hawaii ($3.31) have the highest prices.

Earlier this month, I named “project selection” as one of my Top 5 Transportation Issues for 2015. Just in the first month of this year, we’ve already seen a variety of developments in a number of areas that stand to influence project selection in the years ahead. New governors are already putting their stamp on project selection by reviewing projects approved by their predecessors and by nominating new (or in some cases old) leaders to head state departments of transportation. I also have updates on ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft, public transportation projects, autonomous vehicles and state transportation planning processes.

With nearly a month gone in 2015, it’s time once again to check in on states that are considering their transportation funding options this year. Governors are using their State of the State addresses to establish finding funding solutions as a priority and lawmakers are moving forward with plans of their own as legislative sessions get underway in many states. I have a look at what’s happening in 16 states, some additional resources where you can read more and a few words about how you can join us for an upcoming discussion on what’s going on around the country.

As Congress struggles to come up with the kind of multi-year transportation authorization bill that was once customary and with the idea of a federal gas tax increase to pay for it still divisive despite low oil prices, one revenue mechanism that has long been considered a possible replacement for the gas tax is expected to have a pivotal year: the mileage based user fee (MBUF) aka vehicle miles traveled (VMT) fee/tax aka road usage charge. But some wonder whether the mechanism can ever truly become what transportation policy experts originally expected and whether its adoption will be derailed by privacy concerns that some say are largely unfounded. Those were some of the issues on the minds of speakers at last week’s Transportation Research Board (TRB) annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Sean Slone, Program Manager for Transportation Policy, outlines the top five issues in transportation policy for 2015, including uncertain federal funding, alternative funding mechanisms such as public-private partnerships and tolling, and the ways infrastructure spending contribute to workforce development and growing the nation's economy.

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