Transportation

CSG Midwest
Indiana, Kansas and Wisconsin have joined the growing number of states with new rules to govern ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft. These services now operate in at least 30 metropolitan areas in the Midwest. They allow individuals needing a ride to connect with a driver via an application on a smartphone or other Internet-enabled device. The driver’s personal vehicle is used for the service.
CSG Midwest

The Nebraska Unicameral Legislature's override of a gubernatorial veto will give certain immigrants access to state driver's licenses. LB 623 covers immigrants who have been granted "deferred action" status by the federal government. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, applies to individuals under the age of 31 who came to this country before their 16th birthday.

CSG Midwest
Two years ago, an explosive fire caused by a rail tanker car carrying crude oil took 47 lives and destroyed much of the downtown Québec city of Lac Megantic. A number of nonfatal fires involving oil-carrying trains have followed, most recently this year in Illinois and North Dakota. These incidents have raised safety concerns on both sides of the border, as well as this question: What can governments do to prevent the accidents from occurring? This spring, a mix of new federal and state standards were unveiled that set new rules for tanker cars and what is being loaded on them.

As rideshare companies like Uber and Lyft are changing America’s transportation landscape, so too are they impacting state policy as legislators try to address insurance-related issues that have arisen around these services. This free eCademy webcast offered an essential briefing on the emerging insurance-related regulatory and legislative landscape surrounding these services. This eCademy session was part of a collaboration between CSG and The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation to inform state officials on insurance issues, while maintaining a commitment to an unbiased, nonpartisan and academic approach to programming.

 

A bipartisan group of senators this week introduced a six-year transportation authorization bill that proposes to increase highway spending by almost 13 percent and spread more than $2 billion a year among states to invest in freight facility improvements. But with a July 31 deadline fast approaching, Congress is still at a loss when it comes to how they might pay for such a bill.

James Corless is the Director of Transportation for America (T4America). Jeff Davis and Emil Frankel are Senior Fellows at the Eno Center for Transportation. All three were panelists at a May 12 transportation policy roundtable as part of the 2015 CSG Transportation Policy Academy. In these excerpted portions of their remarks to state legislators attending the academy, they discuss the past, present and future of the federal-state-local partnership on transportation.

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Traditionally, launching satellites and other equipment into orbit has been the exclusive purview of the federal government, with NASA building and launching the equipment.  However, in recent years several private firms have entered the industry, launching on contract for private firms as well as federal agencies, especially the Department of Defense.  These launches are extremely expensive, with costs running from $100 million to $460 million, depending on the contractor and...

In 2014 slightly less than five percent of state tax revenue, or $41.5 billion, came from fuel taxes according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 Annual Survey of State Government Tax Collections. Just 1.3 percent of Alaska’s tax revenue came from fuel taxes – the lowest percentage among states – compared to 8.6 percent in South Dakota – the highest among states.

Next month, state and federal officials and representatives of the private sector will converge on New York City for the InfraAmericas U.S. P3 Infrastructure Forum 2015, an annual conference assessing the state of public-private partnerships in infrastructure. In anticipation of that event, here’s a roundup of recent news on P3 projects around the country. I have items on when Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan might decide the fate of a P3 light rail project, why a new Cape Cod bridge might be closer to reality and why an Ohio bypass may cost more than originally advertised. Plus details on how you can register to attend the InfraAmericas forum to join the conversation on this important tool many state policymakers are turning to as they seek to meet the nation’s infrastructure needs.

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