Transportation

With August drawing to a close, it’s time to check in once again on what states are up to on the transportation funding front. The number of states to increase their gas taxes this year now stands at seven with the addition of Washington State last month. Other states could be poised to join their ranks in the months ahead. Here’s a roundup of some of the latest developments and links where you can read more.

The city of Denver and state of Colorado have seen their share of transportation successes in recent years, thanks in large measure to regional cooperation, federal investment, a 2004 tax increase, partnerships with the private sector and some innovative thinking. But the city and state face numerous challenges in the years ahead that will severely test the transportation system, notably a burgeoning population, stagnant federal investment and limits to increasing taxes at the state level. Those were some of the messages state and local officials imparted to a group of state legislators from eight states at the CSG West Transportation Forum last month in Denver.

The city of Denver and state of Colorado have seen their share of transportation successes in recent years thanks in large measure to regional cooperation, federal investment, a 2004 tax increase, partnerships with the private sector and some innovative thinking. But the city and state face numerous challenges in the years ahead that will severely test the transportation system, notably a burgeoning population, stagnant federal investment and limits to increasing taxes at the state level. Those were some of the messages state and local officials delivered to a group of state legislators from eight states at the CSG West Transportation Forum last month in Denver.

Congress voted last week to approve a three-month extension of spending authority for federal surface transportation programs that also replenishes the Highway Trust Fund through mid-December with an $8 billion cash infusion. Despite averting a July 31 deadline after which the U.S. Department of Transportation had said it would stop authorizing payments to states for work on transportation projects, lawmakers failed to come up with a longer-term solution before the start of their August recess. Further negotiations will have to be postponed until the fall, leaving states in the same uncertain position they’ve been in for much of the past six years.

During a recent CSG eCademy webcast, “Rideshare Companies: Insurance and Regulatory Issues for States,” Staking discussed insurance coverage and the risks associated with rideshare services, which he also referred to as transportation network companies. The webcast was part of a collaboration between CSG and The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation.

Gas tax increases were the centerpiece of transportation funding packages in six states during the first half of 2015. Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Utah all moved to increase their fuel taxes. Two other states—Kentucky and North Carolina—also made efforts to prevent expected declines in gas tax revenues and to make their gas taxes more sustainable.

Eight state legislators from around the country, many of them transportation committee chairs or vice chairs in their respective states, attended the 5th Annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy May 11-13, 2015 in Washington, D.C. The academy, which took place during Infrastructure Week, included a tour of transportation projects in Northern Virginia, a keynote address by Maryland Secretary of Transportation Pete Rahn, a luncheon at the D.C. office of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), a standing-room-only briefing for Capitol Hill staffers on the importance of continuing federal transportation investment to state and local officials, a conversation with officials at the U.S. Department of Transportation, a dinner with representatives of two of the largest transportation-related membership associations—the American Road & Transportation Builders Association and the American Public Transportation Association and a briefing on the status of state exploration of mileage-based user fees. Attendees also took part in a transportation policy roundtable with representatives of ASCE, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Transportation for America, the Eno Center for Transportation, the American Trucking Associations and UPS. Finally, the legislators were able to take part in Infrastructure Week activities including Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill. This page includes photos from the three-day academy, the complete agenda for the event and links to web pages where you can read extended excerpts of remarks from many of the speakers.

Eight state legislators from around the country, many of them transportation committee chairs or vice chairs in their respective states, attended the 5th Annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy May 11-13, 2015 in Washington, D.C. The academy, which took place during Infrastructure Week, included a tour of transportation projects in Northern Virginia, a keynote address by Maryland Secretary of Transportation Pete Rahn, a luncheon at the D.C. office of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), a standing-room-only briefing for Capitol Hill staffers on the importance of continuing federal transportation investment to state and local officials, a conversation with officials at the U.S. Department of Transportation, a dinner with representatives of two of the largest transportation-related membership associations—the American Road & Transportation Builders Association and the American Public Transportation Association and a briefing on the status of state exploration of mileage-based user fees. Attendees also took part in a transportation policy roundtable with representatives of ASCE, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Transportation for America, the Eno Center for Transportation, the American Trucking Associations and UPS. Finally, the legislators were able to take part in Infrastructure Week activities including Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill. This page includes photos from the three-day academy, the complete agenda for the event and links to web pages where you can read extended excerpts of remarks from many of the speakers.

July 1, 2015 marks a big day for the future of transportation funding in a number of states. Six states see their gas tax rates increase today, the result of not only 2015 legislative actions but also actions that took place in previous years as well as automatic increase mechanisms. Meanwhile, Oregon begins a closely watched program that could determine how transportation will be funded in the years ahead. And a number of state legislatures are in the process of completing work on major transportation funding packages as they prepare to adjourn for the year. It all sets the stage for a month in which Congress must come up with a plan to address federal transportation funding before a July 31st deadline.

CSG South

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

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