Privacy

On May 22, 2014,  with  Governor Bobby Jindal’s signature, Louisiana  joined the ranks of states such as Wisconsin and Tennessee in barring employers and educational institutions from requesting or requiring personal social media account access with the “Personal Online Account Privacy Protection Act”( HB 340).

CSG Midwest logo
Amazon wants to use a drone to deliver your new jacket, and a beer company thinks unmanned aircraft systems are perfect for deliveries to remote Minnesota lakes. But at the same time, hunters and anglers in downstate Illinois are concerned that animal-rights activists will use drones with cameras to interfere with their sport.
Drones are still most known for their use by the U.S. military, but they are beginning to get more attention from state legislators and others who set domestic policy.
The recent activity in Illinois is a case in point.

The Supreme Court decided today that it will hear two cases addressing whether police can search cell phones or smartphones without a warrant subsequent to arrest. Case law on what police can and cannot do when they make an arrest is pretty settled - they can search the person being arrested and what's within that person's reach, particularly to find weapons or evidence that could be destroyed. However, the lower courts are divided on whether or not cellphones or smartphones can be searched without a warrant in the same way. 

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments endorses the Aerospace States Association’s policy paper “UAS Privacy Concerns” addressing unmanned aircraft systems privacy concerns; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments supports the Federal Aviation Administration-monitored use of UAS as emerging technologies with a potential economic benefit for states.

Stateline Midwest ~ 2013 Annual Meeting Edition

Soon after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the right of states to gather DNA samples from arrestees, lawmakers in two Midwestern states advanced measures to expand the scope of their collection programs.
The Internet has transformed everything we do—from buying groceries to boarding an airplane—and has emerged as the engine of a new global economy. Its growth is fueled by a set of emerging technologies and business models that are challenging our ability to control how and with whom our personal information is shared, as well as changing our understanding of privacy. These developments in technology and enterprise have created new privacy risks for individuals and corporations. Attorneys general are seeking the best ways to manage those risks by investigating, educating and advocating for meaningful online protections and controls that protect our privacy while also protecting the growth of this new economy. The attorneys general also are tracking implementation of the national $25 billion mortgage
servicing settlement they reached last year to bring relief to homeowners.
 

The Act establishes a voluntary surveillance access database where residential homeowners and business owners may elect to have information and/or images obtained from their closed-circuit television or other electronic surveillance systems made available to law enforcement agencies.

The rapid expansion of aerial surveillance technology with unmanned vehicles like drones was an issue of significant concern and interest across states. The signaling by the Federal Aviation Administration to open up more air space for commercial use by drones, and their application for law enforcement purposes precipitated the passage of several pieces of legislation across the country
adding new parameters on the use of this transformational technology.

Stateline MIdwest ~ October 2012

Iowa will issue driver’s licenses and state identification cards next year that meet the initial security standards set out under the federal government’s REAL ID program. According to the Quad City Times, all new driver’s license applicants will be given Iowa’s new cards. Individuals with existing licenses will not have to make the switch.

Stateline Midwest

Illinois lawmakers have added a layer of privacy protection for workers by forbidding employers from requesting information that would give them access to an individual’s social-networking account.

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