Crime

An article in today's Washington Post reports on the flurry of new state laws targeting human trafficking, including dozens of laws to increase criminal penalties against traffickers and provide assistance to victims. 

This week, both the Washington Post and the New York Times have reported on the growing popularity of "spice," the generic term for a legal synthetic substitute for the active ingredient in marijuana.  Sold in many locations as packages of incense, the herbal mixture is coated with a chemical that causes some of the same effects of marijuana. 

Methamphetamine, or meth, is a highly addictive, synthetically produced, central nervous system stimulant that, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), is the most common synthetic drug manufactured in the United States. The recent, rapid growth of methamphetamine users in the United States largely is due to the ability to produce it using conventional, easily  accessible chemicals and supplies.

As the costs of prosecuting and incarcerating marijuana users continues to escalate, several states have decriminalized possession of small amounts of the drug. while some consider legalization.  Supporters argue that the money saved could be better used to investigate more serious crimes and to provide drug treatment options.  Opponents argue that such efforts would lead to increased drug use.

While the modern office of the attorney general continues to perform its traditional role of providing legal advice and legal representation in matters affecting the state’s interests, those state interests now include an infinitely broader range of social and economic policies and protection of the public interest. Three of the top issues for attorneys general this year are cybercrime, consumer protection and tobacco. As the chief legal officer of each state or jurisdiction, attorneys general are committed to arresting online predators and providing services to victims of child pornography, protecting consumers during the economic downturn from lending abuses and scams, and continuing to interpret, implement and enforce the Master Settlement Agreement reached with the tobacco industry in 1998.

E-newsletter Issue #47 | May 27, 2010


States face a loss of 10 percent of their federal Byrne Justice Assistance grants if they don’t find a way to comply with the Adam Walsh Act by next year.

Problem is, the cost to implement provisions that would bring them into compliance could cost even more than what they could lose.

On May 11, President Obama announced a new approach to "confronting the complex challenge of drug abuse and its consequences."   The new National Drug Control Strategy calls for reducing the rate of youth drug use by 15 percent over the next five years and for similar reductions in chronic drug use, drug abuse deaths and drugged driving.

State prescription drug monitoring programs are used to control drug misuse that cause the epidemic of accidental deaths. CSG's interstate compact will enable efficient data sharing between states for public health and law enforcement purposes.

State eNews Issue #42 | March 17, 2010
 

A registered sex offender was arrested and charged with the rape and murder of San Diego high school student Chelsea King March 1. John Gardner had previously served just five years in prison for committing lewd and lascivious acts on a 13-year-old, despite the recommendations by a court psychiatrist that he serve a much longer sentence because he presented a continued danger to underage girls in the community.

The Stalking Resource Center of the National Center for Victims of Crime and the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) announce the release of Responding to Stalking: A Guide for Community Corrections Officers at the APPA’s recent Winter Training Institute in Austin, Texas. The new publication describes steps probation and parole officers can take to protect victims and prevent crimes by offenders who engage in stalking behavior.

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