Kansas Senator Vicki Schmidt will be making a presentation about the Prescription Drug Monitoring compact at the National Conference of State Legislators Legislative Summit July 28 in Louisville, KY.  The compact, which was developed by CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts, aims to allow states to share prescription drug data across state lines.  Senator Schmidt, who chaired both CSG’s advisory committee and drafting team, has been instrumental in the compact’s development.  CSG staff will also be available during the session should any questions come up about the compact. 

Download Sen. Schmidt's Power Point Presentation:  Prescription Drug Monitoring Compact

The National Center for Interstate Compacts, in conjunction with CSG’s Energy and Environment Task Force, will be convening two advisory committee meetings to explore the possibility of an interstate compact to govern interstate transmission line siting.  The first meeting of the advisory panel,  which will be comprised of state and federal officials, subject matter experts, interested stakeholders, and compact experts, will be hosted by Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner Moeller’s Office July 29 and 30 at FERC headquarters in Washington, DC.  The meeting will be co-chaired by Representative Tom Sloan of Kansas and Representative Kim Koppelman of North Dakota.  For more information about the effort and about the National Center for Interstate Compacts please click here

Crady deGolian and Rick Masters recently spoke about CSG’s ongoing effort to assist states in developing a prescription drug monitoring compact at the sixth annual Harold Rogers PDMP Meeting in Washington DC.  The meeting, which was presented by the Alliance for State with Prescription Drug Programs, drew state PMP administrators, federal officials and national organizations with an interest in reducing the abuse of prescription drugs.  During the presentation Crady and Rick educated the group about compact law, provided specific details about the ongoing PMP compact, and answered several questions about the future of the project.

With the additions of Illinois, Rhode Island, South Carolina and Tennessee, the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities has grown to 35 states, covering approximately 86 percent of the impacted population.  This is another significant milestone for the Compact, which aims to reduce the educational challenges of transitioning military children.  To learn more about compact membership please click here

Illinois, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Tennessee are each one step closer to joining to Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children.  In each state legislators overwhelming passed the compact, which attempts to ease educational issues associated with the frequent moves of military families.  To find out more about the compact or to learn if your state is already a member please click here.

The National Center for Interstate Compacts continues to play a leading role in the development of an interstate compact that would allow states to securely share data about the use and movement of prescription drugs across state lines.  The project, which began in the fall of 2009 through funding from CSG’s 21st Century Foundation, has been widely endorsed by stakeholders and subject matter experts.

State prescription drug monitoring programs are used to control drug misuse that cause the epidemic of accidental deaths. CSG's interstate compact will enable efficient data sharing between states for public health and law enforcement purposes.

With the additions of New Jersey, New Mexico, South Dakota, and Utah during the 2010 legislative session the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children has grown to 30 member states, ensuring that approximately 85 percent of the impacted population is now covered by the compact.

The Interstate Commission on Educational Opportunity for Military Children has hired retired Brig. Gen. Norman E. Arflack to serve as the Commission’s first Executive Director. Gen. Arflack brings an extensive amount military and state government experience to the Commission.

State eNews Issue #38 | January 20, 2010
 

Kentucky has a pretty good program for monitoring the dispensation of prescription drugs.

The Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting system—or KASPER for short—requires anyone who writes a prescription in the state to report it to the system within seven days, said Dave Hopkins, KASPER program manager.

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