Ongoing Projects

A new transmission line siting compact developed by CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts could be the key for states hoping to spur transmission line growth without the interference of the federal government.

One solution to the growing challenge of siting interstate transmission lines may be the formation of an interstate compact governing transmission line siting.   The Energy Policy Act of 2005 granted states advance congressional consent to create regional interstate compacts and CSG, through the National Center for Interstate Compacts, and with the assistance of a drafting team comprised of subject matter experts has developed model language for state consideration.  

The National Center for Interstate Compacts will unveil language for a compact intended to ease efforts among states to site interstate electricity transmission lines during a 2:30-4 p.m. session Dec. 2 at The Council of State Governments’ 2012 National Conference in Austin, Texas.

With growth rates approaching 20 percent, online learning represents the fastest growing segment of the higher education population.  These statistics are only expected to continue climbing as technology continues to improve. The State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement, developed jointly by CSG and The Presidents’ Forum, that aims to promote interstate reciprocity in online and distance learning. 

CSG, through The National Center for Interstate Compacts, is pleased to announce the publication of "The Evolution of Interstate Compacts." Interstate compacts are the only form of multi-state cooperation specifically referenced in the Constitution.  The brief looks outlines the history of interstate compacts and specifically addresses how modern compacts are being used to address cross border policy challenges.  To read the brief please click here...

A draft model interstate agreement was recently released for public review by The Council of State Governments’ (CSG) and The Presidents’ Forum. Known as the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA), this model agreement, which has been developed jointly by CSG, The Presidents’ Forum, and a drafting team comprised of state regulators and key stakeholders aims to reduce barriers to distance learning by making it more efficient for colleges and universities to offer classes across state lines.  Additionally, the project leadership is working with the existing higher education regional compacts (WICHE, MHEC, NEBHE, and SREB) to promote a unified approach to achieving interstate reciprocity.   Support for the project is provided by the Lumina Foundation for Education.

A drafting team convened jointly by CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts and the Presidents’ Forum is continuing efforts to develop a compact to facilitate interstate reciprocity in distance learning.  A working draft of the compact, known as the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA), was released earlier this week during a presentation at The National Association of State Administrators and Supervisors of Private Schools (NASASPS) annual meeting. 

The Presidents' Forum and The Council of State Governments' National Center for Interstate Compacts has released a working draft of the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA). You can find it on the updated NCIC website here along with a PowerPoint presentation discussing the compact.

The compact is the result of a series of both teleconferenced and in-person meetings.  The in-person meetings have been as follows:...

The Council of State Governments' National Center for Interstate Compacts, in conjuction with the Presidents' Forum, and with support from the Lumina Foundation are working to produce a national (but not federal) compact to help states better work together to offer online courses across state lines.  This compact, in its final form, is intended to help students get access to the skills they need to compete in the global economy.  The compact will also help institutions save money by removing redundant regulatory burdens involved with offering courses on a multistate basis and help states develop a more educated and productive workforce.

Enrollment in online courses has increased substantially over the past decade.  Online, educational offerings are flexible and allow students to develop the skills they need to be competitive in the job market even if they cannot regularly attend class and/or are located remotely.  The current, complex regulatory environment in the states inhibits many institutions from delivering these courses across state lines.  CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts, in conjunction with the Presidents’ Forum and with support from the Lumina Foundation, is developing an interstate compact to allow greater reciprocity in online education among the states.

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