National Center for Interstate Compacts

Since its founding, CSG’s Compact Center has worked to promote the use of interstate compacts as an ideal tool to meet the demand for cooperative state action.  During that time there have been approximately 180 adoptions of CSG supported compacts, including 10 separate adoptions of different projects during the 2014 legislative session. Two of those compacts have expanded to all 50 states, while the Educational Opportunity for Military Compact has now grown to 48 states.  Below is a summary of various CSG compact projects.

On May 16 Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton signed the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children.  The addition of Minnesota brings compact membership to 48 states.  Only New York and New Hampshire have not joined the compact.  The Compact, which was developed jointly by CSG’s Compact Center and the Department of Defense, ensures the uniform treatment and resolves education transition issues faced by children of active duty service members transferring between school districts and states. To learn more about...

A newly launched telepsychiatry program in North Carolina is resulting in patients spending less time waiting in hospital emergency rooms for mental health services and decreasing their likelihood of returning for treatment.  The program, which started January 1, 2014, is a joint initiative between the Governor’s office, the Department of Health and Human Services, and East Carolina University.  28 of the 100 counties in North Carolina do not have a single psychiatrist, which is creating a statewide shortage for mental health services.  As a result the state is electronically connecting patients with a psychiatrist via a secured two-way video connection.

On Monday, April 28 Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal signed the updated Interstate Compact for Juveniles.  The new compact will take effect July 1, 2014.  The addition of Georgia means all 50 states plus the District of Columbia and the US Virgin Islands have now joined the compact. 

The creation of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in 1922 through an interstate compact signaled a significant shift in the use and application of interstate compacts. For the first time states began using compacts to establish regulatory agencies with the authority to act on the state’s behalf. Known as administrative compacts, these agreements frequently allow for a sophisticated governing structure that possess the authority to pass rules, draft bylaws, form committees, and hire staff to carry out the daily operations of the compact.  

When a Nevada rancher sparked a standoff with the Bureau of Land Management over grazing his cattle without paying fees to the federal government, it highlighted once again the longstanding debate over ownership of federal lands in the West.

 Policymakers from eight Western states gathered April 18 in Salt Lake City for a legislative summit to discuss the transfer of public lands from the federal government back to the states. Some state leaders believe they are better prepared to manage the land and will do so in an economically and environmentally responsible way.

When a Nevada rancher sparked a standoff with the Bureau of Land Management over grazing his cattle without paying fees to the federal government, it highlighted once again the longstanding debate over ownership of federal lands in the West.

Policymakers from eight Western states gathered April 18 for a legislative summit to discuss the transfer of public lands from the federal government back to the states....

The popular perception that interstate compacts provide a tool for states to work cooperatively to avoid a federally mandated solution is true, but the long held opinion oversimplifies the use of compacts....

Interstate compacts often are viewed as a way for states to work cooperatively to avoid federal intervention or a federally mandated solution. While that is an accurate statement, it does not mean the federal government does not play a role in the compact process. In fact, federal officials are active in a number of compacts, with participation ranging from congressional consent to direct federal involvement.

Oregon took a significant step this week toward joining the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children when state lawmakers passed SB 1506 and sent it to Gov. John Kitzhaber's desk for his signature.  Compact legislation is also being actively considered in Minnesota.  Should Oregon and Minnesota join the compact it would push membership to 48 states plus the District of Columbia.  The Compact, which was developed jointly by CSG’s Compact Center and the Department of Defense, ensures the uniform treatment...

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