Interstate Compacts

Demand for energy is rising, both in the U.S. and around the world. But supplies can’t keep up with demand if energy that is produced in one locale can’t be moved to consumers who need it.  “The challenge of moving energy from where it is produced to where it is needed has never been greater. It is a challenge that not only spans state boundaries, but also international borders,” said Kansas Rep. Tom Sloan.

The use of interstate compacts has evolved considerably throughout the course of American history. Each state belongs, on average, to 25 different agreements of the approximately 215 active interstate compacts. In the last half century, interstate compacts have become more sophisticated and are being used to create administrative agencies to solve ongoing state policy challenges.

The following compilation features published news stories during the week of Aug. 14-20 that highlight experts and/or research from The Council of State Governments. For more information about any of the experts or programs discussed, please contact CSG at (800) 800-1910 and you will be directed to the appropriate staff.  Members of the press should call (859) 244-8246.

CSG Research & Expertise in the News: 8/7-13, 2011

The following compilation features published news stories during the week of Aug. 7-13 that highlight experts and/or research from The Council of State Governments. For more information about any of the experts or programs discussed, please contact CSG at (800) 800-1910 and you will be directed to the appropriate staff.  Members of the press should call (859) 244-8246.

A movement to replace the Electoral College with a national popular vote in determining presidential elections has reached the halfway point.  Yesterday, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a bill (AB 459) that ratified the state’s inclusion in the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC), which seeks to replace the current Electoral College with rules that would guarantee the election of the winner of the national popular vote.

The Department of Defense

"An interstate compact is spurring sweeping improvements to the school transition process for military parents and their children, while also making inroads into addressing parents’ education-related concerns, a Defense Department official said.

The Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children affects everything from school enrollment and eligibility to course placement and graduation, explained Ed Kringer, director of state liaison and educational...

CSG Research & Expertise in the News: 7/17-23, 2011

The following compilation features published news stories during the week of July 17-23 that highlight experts and/or research from The Council of State Governments. For more information about any of the experts or programs discussed, please contact CSG at (800) 800-1910 and you will be directed to the appropriate staff.  Members of the press should call (859) 244-8246.

On Thursday, Missouri became the latest state to join the Health Care Compact after the legislation became law without signature after Missouri Governor Jay Nixon allowed the bill to exceed the signing deadline.

When our Founding Fathers wrote the Constitution, they included language that grants states the authority to enter into interstate agreements to achieve a common purpose. This directive, found in Article I, Section 10, Clause 3 of the Constitution, is known as the Compacts Clause. In it, the founders asserted, in part, that “no state shall, without the consent of Congress enter into any agreement or compact with another state, or with a foreign power.”  This often-overlooked clause of the Constitution also grants Congress the power to approve or deny the validity of a compact—a concept called congressional consent. 

This article reviews interstate relations developments since 2007 pertaining to uniform state laws, interstate compacts and administrative agreements, same-sex marriage, civil unions and other pertinent legal matters.

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