Interstate Compacts

With state legislative sessions getting ready to gear back up in the New Year, the newly drafted Interstate Medical Licensure Compact continues to receive wide spread endorsement from both state boards and key stakeholder groups.  To date, 17 state medical and osteopathic boards have formally endorsed the Compact, including.

Multi-State Internet Gaming Agreement (Statement)

Existing law authorizes certain gaming establishments to obtain a license to operate interactive gaming. Sections 2-5 of this bill define certain terms for the purposes of determining whether a person may be found suitable for a license to operate interactive gaming. Section 6 of this bill requires the Nevada Gaming Commission to adopt regulations authorizing the...

The act expands upon previous legislation (AB 114) that allows Nevada to develop and enter in to interstate compacts for online gaming. This act allows Nevada to not only other work out agreements with other states, but with foreign governments and tribal areas, as well. The bill defines eligible compact partners as “any governmental unit of a national, state or local body exercising governmental functions, other than the United States Government. This term includes, without limitation, national and sub-national governments, including their respective departments, agencies and instrumentalities and any department, agency or authority of any such governmental unit that has authority over gaming and gambling activities.” Agreements with international operators must follow the regulations already in place by Nevada’s Gaming Commission.

Following the lead of emergency medical services and doctors, a group of physical therapists and state board administrators are working to develop a licensing compact that would make it easier for physical therapists to practice in multiple states. This type of agreement could significantly increase access to physical therapy services in rural and hard-to-serve areas, which in turn has the potential to reduce costs for patients, states and the federal government. The compact also could allow providers to take advantage of improving technologies and offer more telehealth services.

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In September, more than 60 people from across the Great Lakes basin came to western Lake Erie for three days of fishing. But it was far from a pleasure trip. Instead, these employees from 10 different government agencies (state, federal and provincial) were testing the region’s capabilities to respond to future crises involving invasive species.

Ever since Asian carp were found to be dangerously close to entering the lakes, the region’s states and provinces have been on high alert. And part of their response has been to work more closely together — for example, sharing personnel, expertise and supplies such as Rotenone, the chemical used to stop the carp’s advance.

Earlier this year, at a meeting of the Council of Great Lakes Governors, the region’s governors and premiers signed a mutual-aid agreement that formalizes the process for how jurisdictions assist each other when an invasive-species threat arises.
 

Delegates from the American Medical Association (AMA) formally endorsed the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact at this week’s 2014 AMA Interim Meeting.  The compact, which creates a process for expedited licensing for doctors wishing to practice in multiple states, was developed jointly by the Federation of State Medical Boards, CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts, and a drafting team comprised of state medical board officials. 

Crady deGolian, Director of CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts (NCIC), and Rick Masters, who serves as Special Counsel to NCIC will present on the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact at the annual Administrators in Medicine conference later this week.  The compact is intended to create an expedited licensing  process for physicians wishing to practice in multiple states.  It aims to increase access to health care services, facilitate licensure portability and telemedicine.   Participation in the compact is voluntary, both for states and physicians.

This article reviews developments in interstate relations pertaining to uniform state laws, interstate compacts and administrative agreements, civil unions and same-sex marriage, and other pertinent interstate legal matters since 2011.

The State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement has now been approved in nine states, with eight of those states already approving institutional participation in the agreement.  Alaska, Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, and Washington have already joined SARA.  The existing higher education regional compacts are actively assisting their member states in ensuring that states wishing to participate in the agreement meet the necessary requirements to join.

With one swipe of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s pen, the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children, known as MIC3, has now been adopted by all 50 states and the District of Columbia....

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