Health

The Health Policy Group provides policy analysis and innovative programming for state health policy leaders in the legislative and executive branches. This group also develops many publications and health forums for state leaders.

State leaders need access to critical and timely health policy information. CSG staff works to provide officials with best practices and policy analysis, helping lawmakers identify the best health solutions for their states.

CSG Midwest
Earlier this year, Gov. Eric Holcomb signed SB 360, making Indiana the third Midwestern state to enshrine in state law a perinatal “levels of care” rating system for hospitals and birthing centers.

Yesterday, the U.S. Census Bureau released a report with 2017 data on health insurance status in each state. In 2017, 28.5 million people (or 8.8 percent) did not have health insurance at any point during the year. The uninsured rate and number were not statistically different from 2016. In some states the uninsured rate change between 2016 and 2017 was statistically significant. In three states – California, Louisiana, and New York—the percentage of people without insurance decreased, but in 14 states the percentage increased. The states where the uninsured rates increased are Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Ohio, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and West Virginia.

Chapter 9 of The Book of the States 2018 contains the following tables:

For three days in September 2018, state legislative leaders in the health arena will meet at the CSG Medicaid Leadership Academy to hear from federal government representatives and officials from health policy organizations and state Medicaid programs about innovative programs in states that are improving health outcomes and reducing health care costs.

Presentation topics will include dementia-competent care in Virginia, a telehealth diabetes monitoring program in Mississippi, a proposal in Oklahoma to move to value-based...

The Supreme Court has long resolved whether and when state law claims against drug manufacturers are preempted by federal law. The Third Circuit ruling in Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Albrecht is very favorable to state-law claims and likely will be modified, if not reversed, by the Supreme Court.

The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval of a drug warning label does not necessarily insulate drug manufacturers from state-law failure-to-warn claims. In Wyeth v. Levine (2009), the Supreme Court held that state failure-to-warn claims are preempted when there is “clear evidence” the FDA would not have approved the warning a plaintiff claims was necessary. In Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Albrecht, Merck claims there was such “undisputed” evidence in this case but the Third Circuit improperly allowed the case go to a jury for “conjecture as to why the FDA rejected the proposed warning.”

The cost of nursing home/assisted living care has continued to rise. The average daily cost of nursing home care in the United States is $235, with a high of $800 per day in Alaska, and a low of $147 in Oklahoma. The increasing cost of care for loved ones has placed burden on the federal and state governments, as well as the American people searching for cheaper alternatives.

The opioid crisis has devastated families and communities across the nation. As a result, the federal government has begun drafting potential policy solutions that could help mitigate the effects of widespread opioid use. While Congress debates their options, they would do well to look to the states for guidance on the matter.

Several states have adopted innovative strategies that have allowed them to expand access to medication-assisted treatment, or MAT. MAT combines Food and Drug Administration-approved medication—...

CSG Midwest
As part of what state officials say is the strictest set of lead and copper standards in the nation, Michigan will require all of the state’s public water systems to replace their lead service lines. Starting in 2021, the Detroit Free Press reports, each public water system must replace, on average, 5 percent of its lead service pipes per year over a 20-year period, with water customers paying for most of the estimated $2.5 billion price tag.
CSG Midwest
For his first job out of college, psychologist Mark Weist went to work at a mental health center, splitting his time between providing services at the center and a local school. The differences in the two settings were dramatic.
“At the mental health center, people weren’t showing up,” Weist, a professor of psychology at the University of South Carolina, said during a presentation at this year’s Midwestern Legislative Conference Annual Meeting. “We’d be scheduled to see six or seven families in a day, for example, and only somewhere between one and three showed up.
“But in schools, there was this tremendous pent-up need for services.”
That experience nearly 30 years ago has led Weist to become a national leader in efforts to bring the mental health system into the schools, allowing community practitioners to work alongside school psychologists, nurses, social workers and counselors. He listed multiple benefits of school-based mental health: better identifying students in need, improving service access and use, and reducing barriers to learning. 
CSG Midwest
Myriad signs point to the need for better connecting farmers to services that help them deal with stress, depression and other mental health challenges. First, there is the history of the problem: In a study examining various industries between 1992 and 2010, The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health found that farm operators and workers had the highest suicide rate.
Second, many rural U.S. communities struggle with shortages of mental health professionals: 65 percent don’t have a psychiatrist and 47 percent lack a psychologist, according to a 2018 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Third, many of today’s agricultural producers are dealing with high levels of stress, due to factors such as low commodity prices and decreased farm incomes.

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