Chronic Diseases

Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.

Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.

Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.

Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.

 
CSG Health Policy Academy
Reducing the Bill for Chronic Diseases
Wednesday and Thursday, September 18-19, 2013
 
 
Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.
 

The Diabetes Action Plan is a new way to help ensure legislators and other policymakers are strategically taking steps toward reducing the prevalence of diabetes in their state. Kentucky and Texas passed Diabetes Action Plan legislation in 2011, while seven other states—Illinois, Louisiana, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon and Washington—passed legislation in 2013.

Project ECHO has been called a force multiplier and drawn national attention. Launched in 2003 by Dr. Sanjeev Arora at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Project ECHO teams primary care providers in remote communities with specialists in academic medical centers. It’s one of several innovative state programs designed to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending. Programs like this will be featured at the Chronic Disease Health Policy Academy scheduled for Sept. 18-19 at the 2013 CSG National Conference in Kansas City, Mo.

Nineteen million people in the United States had been diagnosed with type I or type II diabetes in 2010, although the number of people diagnosed varies by region. Diabetes costs the U.S. $245 billion in 2012 in both direct and indirect costs. Costs associated with diabetes also vary by region. Direct costs include such things as hospital or nursing home stays, ambulance services and home health services, as well as insulin and other diabetic supplies and treatments, while indirect medical costs refer to absenteeism, unemployment and reduced productivity.

All women should be screened for diabetes after 24 weeks of pregnancy, whether they are exhibiting any symptoms or not, according to the latest draft recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force on May 28.  

The Task Force reached the recommendation after study of the latest comparative effectiveness review. The draft recommendation reverses a 2008 finding that there was insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening.

The new recommendation can provide state policymakers leverage to add a requirement to screen for gestational diabetes to public health and Medicaid prenatal care programs.

There is good news and not so good news in recent diabetes data released by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2010, more than half of all persons with diabetes met individual A1C, blood pressure and cholesterol treatment goals. However, just one in five persons with diabetes was able to meet or exceed all three goals in 2010. This achievement is a marked improvement from just 2 percent who met all three goals in 1988.

Pages