Substance Abuse

CSG Midwest

Few if any U.S. states have been hit harder than Ohio by the crushing rise in drug use, abuse and overdose deaths. That state’s rate of overdose deaths was second in the nation in 2017: 46.5 per 100,000. Behind those numbers, too, are tragic stories that have personally touched many Ohio legislators — and helped lead their ongoing search for policy solutions.

“For multiple years, multiple general assemblies, it has been a legislative priority,” says Ohio Sen. Jay Hottinger, a member of the General Assembly since 1995. “If you wrote just a paragraph on each bill, it would be about 17 or 18 pages.”
He was a sponsor of one of Ohio’s most recently passed bills — last year’s SB 119, known as Daniel’s law in honor of a young Ohio man who died from an opioid overdose after years of fighting addiction. Daniel Weidle had found success in his fight through the use of naltrexone (one of the medications federally approved for treatment of opioid-use disorder), but after losing his provider, Daniel got turned down several times in trying to refill his prescription.

Over twenty speakers will provide real-life exampes of programs and policies that make a difference for persons with opioid use disorders during a day-long Dec. 5 policy academy at the 2018 CSG National Conference in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati. The day will culminate with an audience particpation exercise for attendees to select among 19 different strategies for treatment, harm reduction, reducing demand, and limiting supply by designating theoretical spending of $10 million to $100 million on those strategies.

CSG Midwest
Three Wisconsin law enforcement agencies are beginning a statewide experiment in getting people who commit nonviolent crimes because they’re addicted to drugs into treatment rather than prison.
CSG Midwest
Illinois residents dealing with chronic pain have been given an alternative to opioids — medical marijuana. SB 336 was signed into law in August. It provides certain individuals 21 and older with temporary access to the state’s existing medical cannabis program. This access is contingent on a licensed physician certifying that the individual has a condition for which opioids might be prescribed.
Participants must then register at a state-licensed dispensary. Dispensations are limited to 2.5 ounces every 14 days and cannot exceed 90 days per physician certification. The goal of the new law is to curb opioid addiction; according to the Illinois Department of Public Health, opioid deaths in the state increased 13 percent from 2016 to 2017.

The opioid crisis has devastated families and communities across the nation. As a result, the federal government has begun drafting potential policy solutions that could help mitigate the effects of widespread opioid use. While Congress debates their options, they would do well to look to the states for guidance on the matter.

Several states have adopted innovative strategies that have allowed them to expand access to medication-assisted treatment, or MAT. MAT combines Food and Drug Administration-approved medication—...

CSG South

This SLC Regional Resource raises policy considerations and highlights the connections between the ongoing opioid crisis and the national shortage of organs for transplantation. In addition, this report looks at the history and process of organ donation and transplants; actions taken at the state and federal level to facilitate organ donation; and how the national opioid crisis is affecting transplant rates.

CSG Midwest
Seeking to make greater use of their states’ prescription drug monitoring programs and to prevent opioid abuse, Illinois and Michigan lawmakers have established new requirements for prescribers. These measures were signed into law in December.

Three speakers addressed ways states are both reacting to federal efforts and leading the charge to create sound health policy in the areas of Medicaid and health insurance as well as opioid treatment. The Committee approved two policy resolutions and released CSG's 50-state survey diabetes spending.

Drug abuse is a crisis in the United States that only continues to grow over time. Many states have turned to treatment plans in efforts to slow this trend. The third installment of this research series will examine what states are doing about drug abuse treatment policies.

The National Association of Attorneys General called on insurance companies to prioritize non-opioid pan management options. CVS Health announced it would place a 7 day restriction on opioid prescriptions for new pain patients. CVS Foundation announced $2 million for medication-assisted treatment and recovery services.

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