Mental Health and Substance Abuse

Drug abuse is a crisis in the United States that only continues to grow over time. Many states have turned to treatment plans in efforts to slow this trend. The third installment of this research series will examine what states are doing about drug abuse treatment policies.

The National Association of Attorneys General called on insurance companies to prioritize non-opioid pan management options. CVS Health announced it would place a 7 day restriction on opioid prescriptions for new pain patients. CVS Foundation announced $2 million for medication-assisted treatment and recovery services.

On September 27th, 2017, the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force will convene once again to discuss disability employment policies.  This task force was convened by Governor Matt Bevin in June of 2017.  The mission of the Kentucky Work Matters Task Force is “to address barriers to employment and promote workforce inclusion among people with disabilities, foster children, disabled veterans, individuals with substance abuse issues and individuals with...

Addiction is a driving force for drug abuse. Addiction causes people to do whatever it takes to get ahold of their drug of choice. Often the acquisition of drugs leads to people getting arrested and incarcerated. The second installment of this series will examine how drug abuse in the states affects incarceration.

CSG Midwest
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker signed 11 bills into law in July that seek to address myriad facets of the state’s opioid crisis. The bills were the product of a special session held earlier in the year.

Over the years, substance abuse trends in the states have shift from one drug to another as new policy solutions make previously abused drugs more scarce. Over the past decade, gabapentin has emerged as a drug of concern. Gabapentin, the generic for Neurontin, is a medication that was approved by the FDA in 1993 and is approved to treat epilepsy and nerve pain caused by shingles. The IMS Institute...

On June 8, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, publicly requested that Endo Pharmaceuticals remove their drug, Opana ER, from the market. The agency stated that the benefits of the medication no longer outweighs the risks. According to the FDA, there has been a shift in abuse that has seen an increase in crushing, snorting and injecting the medication. This increase in injection abuse has also seen an increase in HIV and Hepatitis C...

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, estimates that 91 Americans die each day from an opioid overdose. The opioid epidemic is one of the biggest public health challenges in the United States today, leading to higher drug abuse rates, increasing health care costs and imposing additional stress on state budgets. Three new reports released in June 2017 demonstrate the growing need for solutions.

Earlier this week, I spoke with Ohio Rep. Al Landis about a media campaign he has started to bring attention to the opioid crisis in his legislative district and spread a message about prevention. He calls it #gotyourback.  He asks people to post on his own personal Facebook page a picture of themselves back to back with a friend and the words “I’ve got your back! It’s what friends do. Help your friends say no to drugs.”

The campaign springs from his growing alarm about the opioid crisis in Ohio.

CSG Midwest
Over the course of a two-week period in late March and early April, the rules for prescribing painkillers were tightened in Ohio, an improved drug-monitoring system was unveiled in Michigan, and nine bills to prevent opioid abuse won passage in the Wisconsin Assembly. The flurry of activity in those three states illustrates just how big the opioid problem continues to be in many parts of the Midwest, as well as how much of a priority legislative leaders have placed on finding new ways to address it.
Near the top of that priority list is better controlling how prescription drugs are dispensed, prescribed and used.

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