Medicaid

Today's Stateline article by Christine Vestal highlights three states--California, Maryland and New York--that are moving to use Medicaid reimbursement policies to facilitate more counseling for substance use addicts who are in medication-assisted treatment. 

More than 20 legislators from 16 states--many of them in key leadership positions on health or budget committees that deal with Medicaid in their home states--attended a CSG policy academy in Washington D.C. on September 21-23, 2016, to learn how states are making reforms in their Medicaid program that pursue the health "triple aim": improving the quality of care for individuals, improving the health of populations, and reducing per capita costs of health care.

Maybe, but not as soon as Gov. Bentley had hoped.

On Tuesday, Aug. 23, the Alabama House failed to allow a committee meeting to move forward in time to get the lottery proposal, as a constitutional amendment, on the Nov. 8 general election ballot, according to media coverage by AL.com.

CSG South

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

CSG Midwest
Minnesota was an early adopter of the use of health care homes, and a five-year study of their impact shows promising results for any state looking to reduce health costs and improve patient outcomes.
“Given how much is spent for Medicaid, Medicare and dually eligible enrollees, you can create large savings and bend the cost curve,” says Douglas Wholey, a professor of health policy at the University of Minnesota and the study’s lead evaluator.

Gov. Matt Bevin, elected in November 2015 and who had pledged during his campaign to eliminate Medicaid expansion which brought health coverage to 400,000 previously uninsured individuals, announced yesterday his plan to transform Kentucky’s Medicaid system through an 1115 waiver. The new waiver will cover almost all the Medicaid enrollees eligible under the pre-expansion rules as well as all the newly eligible under the expansion rules.

Bevin said his plan is an opportunity “to come up with what is going to be truly a transformative and sustainable and fantastic program,” according The Courier-Journal coverage of the press conference. He pledged to both save money—$2.2 billion in combined state and federal funding over the next five years—and reduce the number of Medicaid enrollees—86,000 people by 2021 by moving them to private insurance.  

According to two recent studies, states that chose to expand Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act have experienced budget savings, revenue gains, and stronger hospitals as a result.

An informational bulletin was released June 1, 2016,  by federal Medicaid officials to inform states how to use Medicaid funds to help states and territorities to prevent, detect and respond to the Zika virus.

For instance, states could choose to cover the costs of over-the-counter insect repellants if prescribed by a health care professional. Additional family planning counseling can be a tool to prevent the spread of the Zika virus and...

CSG Midwest

After some bumps along the way, the Iowa Medicaid program — and some 560,000 Iowans — transitioned to a managed-care model of care in April. Iowa now joins the majority of U.S. states nationally, and within the Midwest, that depend on private entities called managed-care organizations — or MCOs — to deliver Medicaid services to most enrollees in their public insurance programs for low-income families and individuals.

Despite pushing the federal government to provide 100 percent of the cost for health care for American Indians, what South Dakota Gov. Daugaard has characterized as a longstanding treaty obligation, on Feb. 29 Daugaard ruled out Medicaid expansion during this legislative session.

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