Insurance Coverage and Medical Care

The Urban Institute released an analysis of the state-by-state impact of the AHCA, 2019 to 2028. The Urban Institute looked at the impact of the proposal on state funding (see Table 5). If states made up for the loss of federal funds with state funds, it would require a 16.1 percent increase in all states' Medicaid spending over the ten year period. 

Yesterday the Congressional Budget Office – or CBO – released its cost estimate for the House Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. All told, the report says, the federal deficit would be reduced by $337 billion over the 2017-2026 decade. Reducing the federal deficit is welcome news to most federal policymakers.

On Monday, March 6, the House Republicans released the American Health Care Act, the measure intended to fulfill their campaign pledges to repeal and replace the Obama administration Affordable Care Act. Here is the summary provided by the House Republicans. 

Of primary interest to state policymakers, the House plan implements a per capita cap in Medicaid funding, beginning in 2020, based on FFY 2016 spending levels. The House Republican plan has not been scored by the Congressional Budget Office so there are no publicly available data on how much this change will cost states and save the federal government.

CSG Midwest
The first bill signed into law in Minnesota this year will provide relief to the state’s 125,000 residents who purchase their health insurance in the individual market and are not eligible for subsidies under the Affordable Care Act. The cost of premiums for Minnesotans in this population is rising by 55 percent in 2017. 

Yesterday, in response to concerns about insurers pulling out of the ACA marketplaces and raising premiums, the federal government published proposed rules to stabilize the individual and small group health insurance markets.

In a press release, Dr. Patrick Conway, Acting Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services acknowledged the changes are short term relief “while future reforms are being debated.” 

CSG South

Among the many concerns currently facing America's healthcare system, few are more significant, both medically and fiscally, than long-term care (LTC). Broadly defined as a range of services that support individuals who are limited in their ability to care for themselves, long-term care stands to become one of America's foremost healthcare challenges in the years ahead. With the continuing rise of U.S citizens 65 and over — statistically, the demographic most in need of LTC — states need to begin preparing for the growing pressures that will be placed on their budgets by the nation's aging population. This SLC Special Series Report explores the challenges long-term care poses for states in the SLC region. Subsequent reports will examine possibilities for managing long-term care and highlight actions that states in the SLC region have taken to tackle this important issue.

Kaiser Health News has created a special website to keep track of news about changes to the Affordable Care Act. KHN says it will provide analysis, explanation, investigation and data on its site called Repeal & Replace Watch. You can bookmark this on your browser.

A new study from the Commonwealth Fund finds that repeal of two major federal spending provisions of the Affordable Care Act, insurance premium tax credits and the expansion of Medicaid, would ultimately lead to the loss of 2.6 million jobs in 2019. The data, generated by researchers at George Washington, breaks down the impact of repeal for each state. California would lose the most jobs, 334,000 their multistate economic forecasting model suggests, and Wyoming the least with 4,000 jobs lost.

A new study out of Michigan concludes that the state’s Medicaid expansion is to the state’s financial advantage.

When the legislature approved the expansion in 2013, it required that Michigan achieve other health care savings and revenue to offset the state match required starting Jan. 1, 2017 – or the state would reverse its expansion.

CSG Midwest
An informal group of 20 to 24 lawmakers in Wisconsin will concentrate its efforts in 2017 on proposals to boost the state’s supply of rural health care workers and services. The Rural Wisconsin Initiative unveiled its legislative agenda during the latter part of 2016.

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