Information Technology

Health educators are providing sexual health information to individuals who send questions via text messages and websites. These innovative approaches are effective in reaching teens through the media they use most, enable education on how to prevent sexually transmitted infections and how to get tested, overcome limited opportunities for face-to-face education, and stretch the limited resources for public health programs. 

Crady deGolian, Senior Policy Analyst with CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts (NCIC) and Rick Masters, special counsel to NCIC, participated in the Prescription Drug Abuse Forum hosted by the Congressional Caucus on Prescription Drug Abuse.  The meeting, which was co-chaired Congressman Hal Rogers (KY-05), Congresswoman Mary Bono Mack (CA-45), and Congressman Bill Delahunt (MA-10) provided an opportunity for subject matter experts to brief members of Congress and legislative staffers about the growing epidemic of prescription drug abuse and steps that are being taken to combat the problem.  

The Prescription Monitoring Program Compact is nearly drafted following a successful meeting between CSG staff and prescription monitoring program experts.  During the day-and-a-half meeting the draft compact underwent a detailed review, with extensive emphasis placed on the compact's Purpose Statement, its definitions, Article III dealing with authorized uses and restrictions on the prescription data, Article IV addressing technology and security, and Article V addressing funding.

The Council of State Governments will convene the fourth meeting of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Compact drafting team next week.  During the meeting, which will take place September 13-14 in Lexington, finishing touches will be put on the draft compact, which CSG aims to have ready for introduction into the states during the 2011 session.  CSG, through The National Center for Interstate Compacts, began efforts to draft the compact in late 2010 at the request of its membership.  To learn more about the meeting or the compact please check CSG's Knowledge Center following the meeting or contact Crady deGolian at cdegolian@csg.org or at 859-244-8068.

 

Kansas Senator Vicki Schmidt will be making a presentation about the Prescription Drug Monitoring compact at the National Conference of State Legislators Legislative Summit July 28 in Louisville, KY.  The compact, which was developed by CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts, aims to allow states to share prescription drug data across state lines.  Senator Schmidt, who chaired both CSG’s advisory committee and drafting team, has been instrumental in the compact’s development.  CSG staff will also be available during the session should any questions come up about the compact. 

Download Sen. Schmidt's Power Point Presentation:  Prescription Drug Monitoring Compact

Crady deGolian and Rick Masters recently spoke about CSG’s ongoing effort to assist states in developing a prescription drug monitoring compact at the sixth annual Harold Rogers PDMP Meeting in Washington DC.  The meeting, which was presented by the Alliance for State with Prescription Drug Programs, drew state PMP administrators, federal officials and national organizations with an interest in reducing the abuse of prescription drugs.  During the presentation Crady and Rick educated the group about compact law, provided specific details about the ongoing PMP compact, and answered several questions about the future of the project.

On May 11, President Obama announced a new approach to "confronting the complex challenge of drug abuse and its consequences."   The new National Drug Control Strategy calls for reducing the rate of youth drug use by 15 percent over the next five years and for similar reductions in chronic drug use, drug abuse deaths and drugged driving.

The National Center for Interstate Compacts continues to play a leading role in the development of an interstate compact that would allow states to securely share data about the use and movement of prescription drugs across state lines.  The project, which began in the fall of 2009 through funding from CSG’s 21st Century Foundation, has been widely endorsed by stakeholders and subject matter experts.

State prescription drug monitoring programs are used to control drug misuse that cause the epidemic of accidental deaths. CSG's interstate compact will enable efficient data sharing between states for public health and law enforcement purposes.

State eNews Issue #38 | January 20, 2010
 

Kentucky has a pretty good program for monitoring the dispensation of prescription drugs.

The Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting system—or KASPER for short—requires anyone who writes a prescription in the state to report it to the system within seven days, said Dave Hopkins, KASPER program manager.

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