Cost and Financing

In a 5-4 decision in National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Becerra, the Supreme Court ruled that a California law requiring licensed pregnancy clinics to disclose they don’t offer abortions and unlicensed pregnancy clinics to disclose the fact they are unlicensed likely violates the First Amendment. The State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) filed an amicus brief in this case asking the Court not to apply the highest level of scrutiny (strict scrutiny) to commercial speech or to every disclosure requirement adopted by states and local governments.

California law requires that “licensed covered facilities” that provide family planning or pregnancy-related services must disseminate a notice stating that publicly-funded family planning services, including contraception and abortion, are available. It also requires “unlicensed covered facilities” to disseminate a notice they are unlicensed. The author of the law noted there are nearly 200 licensed and unlicensed crisis pregnancy centers in California. These centers “aim to discourage and prevent women from seeking abortions.”

The National Institute of Family and Life Advocates (NIFLA) operates licensed and unlicensed covered facilities that don’t offer abortions. It argues these requirements violate its First Amendment right to free speech.

In Reed v. Town of Gilbert, Arizona (2015) the Supreme Court held that strict (usually fatal) scrutiny applies to content-based regulations of speech. One of the questions in NIFLA v. Becerra is whether the Court means for Reed to apply to (nearly) every law regulating content-based speech. The State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) filed an amicus brief arguing that Reed should not be read that broadly.     

California law requires that licensed pregnancy-related clinics disseminate a notice stating that publically-funded family planning services, including contraception and abortion are available. It also requires unlicensed pregnancy-related clinics to disseminate a notice they are unlicensed. The National Institute of Family and Life Advocates (NIFLA) operates 111 pregnancy centers in California. None offer abortions or abortion referrals; only 73 are licensed.

As states across the country continue to transform health care, achieving the balance between cost containment and high quality care remains a primary focus. CSG is pleased to present a FREE eCademy webcast featuring national health care expert Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, who explores strategies to improve the quality of health care delivery while minimizing costs. Brenner is the medical director of the Urban Health Institute at the Cooper University Healthcare as well as the founder and executive director of Camden (N.J.) Coalition of Healthcare Providers. He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013 for his work on addressing the health care needs of the chronically ill in impoverished communities in the U.S. This presentation was broadcast as part of CSG’s 2015 Medicaid Policy Academy in Washington, D.C.

The State Health Care Spending Project, an initiative of The Pew Charitable Trusts and the MacArthur Foundation, has recently published two reports.

The first report is entitled: State Health Care Spending on Medicaid: A 50-state study of trends and drivers of cost. This report is the first in a series of 50-state studies examining seven key areas of state health care spending- Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance...

All but two states maintained or improved eligibility rules for their Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program, commonly known as CHIP, in 2010.These programs continued to be critical to providing insurance coverage for children and families that otherwise would be uninsured. The median state income limit for children’s coverage is now above 200 percent of the FPL, and pregnant women are eligible up to a median of 185% FPL. However, the median income limit for adult coverage is significantly below the higher eligibility level of 133% FPL that will be implemented under health reform in 2014.