Health

The Health Policy Group provides policy analysis and innovative programming for state health policy leaders in the legislative and executive branches. This group also develops many publications and health forums for state leaders.

State leaders need access to critical and timely health policy information. CSG staff works to provide officials with best practices and policy analysis, helping lawmakers identify the best health solutions for their states.

A comparison of U.S. Census data for 2013 and 2014, released in early 2016, shows that a greater portion of Americans in each state had health insurance in the more recent year. Nearly 8.5 million individuals gained health insurance coverage between 2013 and 2014. In 2014, all the provisions of the Affordable Care Act designed to increase access to affordable insurance were in place for states. Some states, however, decided not to expand income eligibility for Medicaid to 138 percent of the federal poverty level as the Supreme Court ruled in 2012 was the prerogative of the states, not Congress. The states that showed the greatest increase in coverage between 2013 and 2014 were states that expanded Medicaid income eligibility.

On June 8, Ohio Governor Kasich signed into law the Medical Marijuana Control Program (House Bill 523), making it the 25th state to legalize medicinal marijuana.

The Small Business Health Care Relief Act of 2016 (H.R.5447) was proposed by Congressman Charles Boustany (R-LA-3) to expand employer healthcare options for small businesses. Cosponsored by 22 Democrats and 37 Republicans, the legislation recently passed the House and was referred to the Senate Calendar as General Order 526.

CSG Midwest
Minnesota was an early adopter of the use of health care homes, and a five-year study of their impact shows promising results for any state looking to reduce health costs and improve patient outcomes.
“Given how much is spent for Medicaid, Medicare and dually eligible enrollees, you can create large savings and bend the cost curve,” says Douglas Wholey, a professor of health policy at the University of Minnesota and the study’s lead evaluator.

On June 27, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down two Texas abortion restrictions. The first required doctors at abortion clinics to obtain admitting privileges at a local hospital. The second required abortion clinics to meet the same standards as hospital-style surgical centers. Currently 26 states have one or both of these provisions.

In Whole Women’s Health v. Hellerstedt the Supreme Court held 5-3 that Texas’s admitting privileges and ambulatory surgical center requirements create an unconstitutional undue burden on women seeking abortions.

The admitting privileges law requires abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. It can be difficult for abortion doctors to obtain admitting privileges because “hospitals often condition admitting privileges on...

The suicide rate from 1999 to 2014 increased by 24 percent, from 10.5 per 100,000 to 13 per 100,000 people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC. That represents an increase of 1 to 2 percent per year, affecting almost every state and demographic.Suicide is now the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The deaths represent on average 113 suicides per day and more than 41,100 lives each year, at a cost to the U.S. economy of more than $51 billion dollars annually in lost work and medical costs.

Gov. Matt Bevin, elected in November 2015 and who had pledged during his campaign to eliminate Medicaid expansion which brought health coverage to 400,000 previously uninsured individuals, announced yesterday his plan to transform Kentucky’s Medicaid system through an 1115 waiver. The new waiver will cover almost all the Medicaid enrollees eligible under the pre-expansion rules as well as all the newly eligible under the expansion rules.

Bevin said his plan is an opportunity “to come up with what is going to be truly a transformative and sustainable and fantastic program,” according The Courier-Journal coverage of the press conference. He pledged to both save money—$2.2 billion in combined state and federal funding over the next five years—and reduce the number of Medicaid enrollees—86,000 people by 2021 by moving them to private insurance.  

Driver distraction is a leading factor in many crashes and texting is one of the most common distractions. State leaders have taken action In 2007, Washington became the first state to ban texting while driving. Nine years later, 46 states and the District of Columbia have passed bans.

In June, Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month is celebrated around the world.

Four years after the Older Americans Act expired, the bill was reauthorized by Congress and on April 16, 2016, signed into law once again by President Obama.

Pages