Government

This article assesses the progress of the states in redrawing state legislative-district lines for the elections of 2002, now that the 2000 Census of Population data is in the hands of state legislatures. It describes emerging trends this decade and highlights the experience of several states in dealing with both old and new issues in redistricting. Whereas the redistricting round of the 1990s can be described as the round of racial and ethnic predominance, the 2000 round will be characterized as the rejuvenation of partisanship.

The demand for e-government services – that is, the delivery of government services through the Internet – continues to increase as citizens and businesses spend more and more time online. There is the expectation that e-government will make government institutions more efficient, accountable and accessible to the public. The states have made significant progress toward these ends as many government services and associated transactions may now be fully executed over the Internet. States are moving further in the development of e-government as services and their related agencies are integrated with one another, a trend which will likely have a tremendous impact on the structure of state government in the near future.

Chapter 1 of the 2000-01 Book of the States contains the following tables:

Chapter 9 of the 2000-01 Book of the States contains the following tables:

Chapter 2 of the 2000-01 Book of the States contains the following tables:

Chapter 4 of the 2000-01 Book of the States contains the following tables:

Chapter 3 of the 2000-01 Book of the States contains the following tables:

Chapter 7 of the 2000-2001 Book of the States contains the following tables:

Trends indicate a tight labor market for Information Technology (IT) professionals in the United States. For example, a report by the Information Technology Association of America and Virginia Tech estimates there are 346,000 vacancies in core IT positions.' Surveys of the private sector show that the recruiting and retaining IT professionals remains a difficult task in light of the increasing demand for employees, the apparent lack of qualified workers and the dynamics of hi-tech industries. 

State governments across the nation have been on the upswing, constantly reforming their governance structures, improving administration and management and innovating policies and programs. This article highlights efforts to improve the capacity of state government, raises pertinent issues and questions, and suggests options for state policy-makers to consider.

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