Executive Branch

Chapter 4 of The Book of the States 2019 contains the following tables:

CSG Midwest
In January, Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed SB 3531...

In an amicus brief in PDR Network, LLC v. Carlton & Harris Chiropractic Inc. the State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) argues that federal courts should be able to refuse to apply federal agency orders which they deem inapplicable even if the orders are covered by the Hobbs Act. While case sounds obscure, numerous Federal Communications Commission (FCC) orders are covered by the Hobbs Act including the small cell order, which preempt local regulations to facilitate the deployment of small cells for 5G.

The Hobbs Act vests the federal courts of appeals with “exclusive jurisdiction” to “enjoin, set aside, suspend (in whole or in part), or to determine the validity of” certain orders made by the FCC and orders of the Secretary of Agriculture, Secretary of Transportation, Federal Maritime Commission, Atomic Energy Commission, and others.

According to one lower court the Hobbs Act “promotes judicial efficiency, vests an appellate panel rather than a single district judge with the power of agency review, and allows uniform, nationwide interpretation of the federal statute by the centralized expert agency.”

CSG members had the privilege of hearing from U.S. Ambassador to Canada Kelly Craft during the 2018 National Conference in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati on Dec. 6. 

Ambassador Craft and other speakers looked at the current relations between the U.S.A. and Canada, including the negotiations of the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, and subnational relations involving American states and Canadian provinces. 

The two governorships up for election in the year following a presidential election are the first statewide electoral indicators of mood following a presidential election. If they draw media coverage beyond their regions, it is often for this reason. The 2017 races drew particular attention this time around because they were the first top-of-the-ballot statewide elections following the inauguration of President Donald Trump in January 2017. With no U.S. Senate candidates on the ballot in 2017, the races for governor became major measures of voter sentiment toward the president.

Neither state had an incumbent running for office. Virginia’s governors are prohibited from serving consecutive terms, and New Jersey’s governors are limited to two consecutive terms, which meant that Gov. Chris Christie (R) could not run in 2017.

Chapter 4 of The Book of the States 2018 contains the following article tables:

CSG Midwest

The race for governor in Kansas got off to an unusual start this election cycle — the announced candidacies of six teenagers, the editor of an alternative weekly newspaper in Oregon, and even a dog. The canine’s run was stopped, but at least as of early this year, nothing in the state’s Constitution or statutes prevented minors and out-of-state residents from seeking the governorship.

“If this isn’t changed, people in prison could run,” adds Kansas Rep. Blake Carpenter, noting the lack of a requirement that a gubernatorial candidate be a “qualified elector.”
Carpenter’s HB 2539, which as of late February had passed the House by a wide margin and was awaiting action in the Senate, adds the “qualifying elector” requirement for anyone running for statewide office. (His bill wouldn’t take effect until January 2019, thus not impacting the campaigns of teens or out-of-state residents running this year.)

On Friday, February 9, 2018, President Trump signed a continuing resolution, or CR, and spending deal that ended a brief government shutdown that morning. The two-year deal funds the federal government at current levels until March 23.

CSG Midwest
North Dakota legislators sued Gov. Doug Burgum in December, alleging he overstepped his line-item veto authority by deleting words or phrases in ways that changed legislative intent. The state’s Supreme Court agreed to hear the case, and gave the governor’s office until Jan. 16 to file a response.
CSG Midwest
A disagreement in Minnesota over tax and budget issues this spring led to a surprising action — a line-item veto by Gov. Mark Dayton of the $130 million appropriation for the House and Senate.

Pages