Water

As the diminished snowpack feeding the Rio Grande River basin begins to flow downstream, the state of Texas and the Mexican government are now locked in a contentious dispute over early releases of irrigation water as drought conditions are expected to again hamper harvests. At issue is a decision by an international body, called the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC), to release water from reservoirs in New Mexico and Texas into canals that irrigate fields in Mexico. The decision sparked strong reaction in a joint letter from the Texas Commissioner of Agriculture and Commissioner on Environmental Quality objecting to the decision as a breach of international treaties governing water flow at the expense of drought-stricken farmers in their state.

Water Smart Homes, water-conserving appliances, and changing landscaping practices can help people to conserve water and save on their water bills.

On February 1st, Texas will join a growing list of states that require drilling operators to disclose the chemicals used in their hydraulic fracturing processes. The pending rule by the Texas Railroad Commission mirrors other states like Montana, Louisiana, Colorado, and North Dakota which require disclosure of well-by-well data on the website FracFocus.org.

Last Friday President Obama rolled out a proposal to reorganize and streamline various agencies and roles within the sprawling reach of the Department of Commerce. One aspect of the plan would move the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the jurisdiction of the Department of Interior. The move has sparked debate over reducing the federal government's size and concern that key functions of national fisheries and oceans policy will be diminished.

The political, environmental and economic battle over the future of laws and regulations governing ballast water discharges has taken some new turns during the latter half of 2011.

The West is running out of water … well, almost. Northwestern and Northcentral Western states are seeing an increase in precipitation and the Southwestern and Southcentral areas are, as expected, experiencing decreased rain. Add to this a temperature increase of five to seven degrees Fahrenheit in key river basins, a lower-than-predicted snowpack—a key feeder of Western water—and you end up with the perfect mixture of short-term events and long-term impacts that are likely to decrease Western stream flow up to 20 percent across several river basins. This session focused on the critical issue of Western water, how states can work and are working together, and what the federal government is doing to assist.

The West is running out of water … well, almost. Northwestern and Northcentral Western states are seeing an increase in precipitation and the Southwestern and Southcentral areas are, as expected, experiencing decreased rain. Add to this a temperature increase of five to seven degrees Fahrenheit in key river basins, a lower-than-predicted snowpack—a key feeder of Western water—and you end up with the perfect mixture of short-term events and long-term impacts that are likely to decrease Western stream flow up to 20 percent across several river basins. This session focused on the critical issue of Western water, how states can work and are working together, and what the federal government is doing to assist.

The West is running out of water ... well, almost. Northwestern and Northcentral Western states are seeing an increase in precipitation and the Southwestern and Southcentral areas are, as expected, experiencing decreased rain. Add to this a temperature increase of five to seven degrees Fahrenheit in key river basins, a lower-than-predicted snowpack—a key feeder of Western water—and you end up with the perfect mixture of short-term events and long-term impacts that are likely to decrease Western stream flow up to 20 percent across several river basins. This session focused on the critical issue of Western water, how states can work and are working together, and what the federal government is doing to assist.

The West is running out of water … well, almost. Northwestern and Northcentral Western states are seeing an increase in precipitation and the Southwestern and Southcentral areas are, as expected, experiencing decreased rain. Add to this a temperature increase of five to seven degrees Fahrenheit in key river basins, a lower-than-predicted snowpack—a key feeder of Western water—and you end up with the perfect mixture of short-term events and long-term impacts that are likely to decrease Western stream flow up to 20 percent across several river basins. This session focused on the critical issue of Western water, how states can work and are working together, and what the federal government is doing to assist.

The West is running out of water … well, almost. Northwestern and Northcentral Western states are seeing an increase in precipitation and the Southwestern and Southcentral areas are, as expected, experiencing decreased rain. Add to this a temperature increase of five to seven degrees Fahrenheit in key river basins, a lower-than-predicted snowpack—a key feeder of Western water—and you end up with the perfect mixture of short-term events and long-term impacts that are likely to decrease Western stream flow up to 20 percent across several river basins. This session focused on the critical issue of Western water, how states can work and are working together, and what the federal government is doing to assist.

  

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