Environment

Imagine yourself (if you can) on an Alaska moose hunting trip riding along in your hovercraft. Oh no your hovercraft has just broken down! While you are repairing it, three National Park Service (NPS) law enforcement officers inform you that you cannot operate it here because of an NPS regulation banning hovercrafts.

You are shocked because you know that while the portion of the Nation River you are on is contained in a national park, Alaska owns (at least) the land under the Nation River.

So what would you do? John Sturgeon sued.   

The Supreme Court has issued a stay preventing the Clean Power Plan regulations from going into effect until the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, and the Supreme Court if it chooses to, rules on the regulations.

The Clean Power Plan requires power plants to reduce carbon emissions and establishes state-by-state targets to accomplish this goal.

America’s water infrastructure is at a crossroads. Water lines installed, in some cases, more than 100 years ago are nearing or past their useful lifespans. In addition, an estimated 6.5 million water lines across the country contain lead, which as exhibited by the current crisis in Flint, Mich., can have devastating consequences to communities if not appropriately managed. Combined with a growing population that demands new infrastructure as new communities are built, the cost of maintaining and expanding the country’s water infrastructure has outpaced available funding. The following infographic provides a snapshot of the state of the nation’s water infrastructure.

Produced water is a term used to describe water trapped in underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil and gas exploration and production. Because the water has been in contact with the hydrocarbon-bearing formation for centuries, it carries some of the chemical characteristics of the formation and the hydrocarbon itself. Produced water may include water from the reservoir, water injected into the formation, and any chemicals added during the drilling, production, and treatment processes. Often, produced water is regarded as wastewater, but if managed as a resource rather than a waste for disposal, produced water has the potential to be used beneficially, such as helping to alleviate drought and reducing earthquakes caused by waste water injection. This webinar explores alternative uses and factors that influence the demand for alternative uses, as well as environmental concerns posed by produced water.

Several states authorize the appointment of emergency managers or some other authority to take over localities in times of economic crisis. Since the recession in 2008, several cities across the nation have been threatened by financial insolvency and states have stepped in to attempt to prevent bankruptcy or to ensure residents continue to receive essential services. However, as details of the recent water crisis in Flint, Mich. continue to emerge, questions have arisen as to the role emergency managers played in this tragedy. The...

In response to the growing problem of harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie and other state waterways, Ohio legislators passed two bills addressing agricultural nutrient management.

The Act requires a phase out, and ultimately, a ban on the manufacture and sale of personal care products that contain plastic synthetic microbeads. The Act bans the manufacture of personal care products containing plastic synthetic microbeads by the end of 2017, the sale of such personal care products and the manufacture of over-the-counter drugs containing the beads by the end of 2018, and the sale of over-the-counter drugs with microbeads by the end of 2019. Synthetic plastic microbeads are used in personal care products because of their exfoliating properties and excellent safety profile, but there are concerns about the potential environmental impact as microbeads may not be captured by wastewater treatment facilities. This Act was passed unanimously in the Legislature, and received the support of industry.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s, or EPA’s, final Clean Power Plan regulates carbon dioxide emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants under Section 111 of the Clean Air Act. The final version of this regulation, published in October 2015, includes a number of key changes from the proposed rule, including an adjusted state plan and implementation schedule, alterations to the “building blocks” on which individual state targets are based and the promotion of interstate trading options. While the overall Clean Power Plan seeks to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from this sector by 32 percent by 2030, each state faces a different target. This controversial rulemaking (as of Oct. 30, 2015, 26 states had filed legal challenges to the final rule) has prompted states to consider legislation directing how state environmental agencies and other officials respond or comply.

CSG Midwest
In the weeks following congressional passage of an omnibus spending bill for fiscal year 2016, Great Lakes advocates were hailing the federal legislation as a victory for protecting and restoring the world’s largest system of fresh surface water. As has been the case in past budget cycles, future funding levels for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiativehad been in doubt. President Obama, who helped create the GLRI during his first year as president, had called for a $50 million reduction in funding for FY 2016.
But the final budget maintains funding at $300 million, and it also formally authorizes the initiative — a move that will put it on more solid footing during the annual budget-making process in Washington, D.C.

The Clean Power Plan

On Aug. 3, 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Clean Power Plan, which is expected to cut carbon pollution from existing power plants by 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. The rule sets target emissions reductions for states and states are responsible for designing their own plans to meet these emissions reductions targets...

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