Power Generation

CSG Director of Energy and Environmental Policy Liz Edmondson outlines the top five issues for 2016, including the Clean Power Plan, the rise of U.S. natural gas production, water quality and quantity, the use of science-based decision making, and electricity transmission and grid reliability. 

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, The Council of State Governments encourages state policymakers to recognize the value the electric grid delivers to all and to: evaluate the system-wide benefits and costs of distributed generation (including costs and benefits relating to the investment in and operation of generation and the transmission and distribution grid) so that those costs and benefits relating to distributed generation can be appropriately allocated and made transparent to regulators, legislators and consumers; and facilitate the continued provision of safe, reliable, resilient, secure, cost-effective, and environmentally sound energy services at fair and affordable electric rates as new and innovative technologies are added to the energy mix; and update policies and regulations to ensure that everyone who benefits from the electric power grid helps pay to maintain it and to keep it operating reliably at all times.

Adjusting to federal government regulations relating to climate change will require meaningful coordination between state legislators, state energy and regulatory agencies, and the regulated community. This session provided an overview of what state legislators need to know about these recent regulatory changes, their anticipated impacts on the states and how state officials can work together to address recent EPA regulations.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s final Clean Power Plant was released Aug. 3 and aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants by 32 percent from the 2005 levels by 2030. The plan promotes emissions trading among states by giving states the opportunity to design plans that allow their power plants to use out-of-state emissions reductions to achieve compliance.

The solar industry is growing rapidly in the United States. With more than 7,000 megawatts of capacity installed in 2014, the total installed capacity in the country climbed to over 20,000 MW, enough to power more than 4 million American households.

Released Aug. 3, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s final Clean Power Plan, designed under section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act, aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants by 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. One of the key changes in the final Clean Power Plan was to promote cross-state emissions trading between states, including through the establishment of mass-based targets and “trading-ready” mechanisms. This free CSG eCademy webcast features experts who discuss state emissions trading options as well as federal plans for states that fail to submit a satisfactory state plan that embraces trading.

CSG Midwest
Minnesota is the only U.S. state with an outright ban on construction of new nuclear power facilities. The state’s prohibition dates back to legislative actions taken in 1994 amid concerns and legal disputes about how and where to store the high-level radioactive waste from these plants. Minnesota has had two such facilities in operation since the early 1970s (Prairie Island, which has two units, and Monticello).
A bill was introduced this year to end the ban (SF 306/HF 1400), but it failed to advance. Two other states inthe Midwest have “de facto” moratoria on new nuclear power plants.

During a recent CSG eCademy webcast, “Pricing Rooftop Solar: Sustainability, Fairness & Promoting Productivity,” two former regulatory commissioners discussed the process used to set utility rates and how to ensure cost fairness and affordability while enabling the growth of distributed generation.

The Obama administration released the final version of the Clean Power Plan last week at a White House ceremony attended by a crowd of administration officials, members of Congress and environmental advocates. This highly anticipated plan is the first comprehensive federal rule to target carbon emissions from existing, new and modified power plants. It is touted as the most ambitious regulation ever aimed at combating climate change.

This Act provides disclosure requirements to be included in agreements for the sale or lease of a distributed energy generating system.

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