Liquid Fuels

Energy issues were a focal point last night in the President's State of the Union address. He highlighted the significant increase in oil and gas production, the vast economic potential of natural gas, energy independence, as well as echoing his continued support for renewable and alternative energy. Below is brief analysis from a state perspective into some of the specific proposals, the reaction from Congress, and the prospects for potential action.

The Obama Administration is expected to announce this afternoon that it will deny a National Interest permit for the Keystone XL pipeline project. TransCanada, the company building the project, will reportedly be given an opportunity to "reapply" once it develops an alternative route to avoid the Sandhills region of Nebraska. 

With recent advances in a process known as hydraulic fracturing or “fracking,” the U.S. may soon be able to boost its energy security while bolstering our economy and creating jobs. Large shale deposits throughout the U.S. are suddenly seeing a flurry of activity that’s being hailed by some for its economic development and criticized by others for environmental concerns. More than 20 percent of U.S. states have proven reserves of oil and gas locked in shale and the economic benefits nationally as well as within each of these states may be tremendous and far-reaching. In this session, experts on all sides of the hydraulic fracturing debate discussed what its production may mean for your state.

With recent advances in a process known as hydraulic fracturing or “fracking,” the U.S. may soon be able to boost its energy security while bolstering our economy and creating jobs. Large shale deposits throughout the U.S. are suddenly seeing a flurry of activity that’s being hailed by some for its economic development and criticized by others for environmental concerns. More than 20 percent of U.S. states have proven reserves of oil and gas locked in shale and the economic benefits nationally as well as within each of these states may be tremendous and far-reaching. In this session, experts on all sides of the hydraulic fracturing debate discussed what its production may mean for your state.

With recent advances in a process known as hydraulic fracturing or “fracking,” the U.S. may soon be able to boost its energy security while bolstering our economy and creating jobs. Large shale deposits throughout the U.S. are suddenly seeing a flurry of activity that’s being hailed by some for its economic development and criticized by others for environmental concerns. More than 20 percent of U.S. states have proven reserves of oil and gas locked in shale and the economic benefits nationally as well as within each of these states may be tremendous and far-reaching. In this session, experts on all sides of the hydraulic fracturing debate discussed what its production may mean for your state.

America runs on oil and like it or not, the nation will continue to do so well into the future. While technological and cultural shifts impacting U.S. dependence on oil are steadily gaining ground, the country consumes more than 19 million barrels of oil each day with half coming from imports; Canada and Mexico are two of the U.S.'s largest energy partners. To boost energy security, create jobs and lower the price at the pump for consumers, the U.S. must work with its continental neighbors to maximize North American oil production. This session explored current and future partnerships across the Northern and Southern borders and new ways the three countries are cooperating to ensure a more secure and reliable resource future.

America runs on oil and like it or not, the nation will continue to do so well into the future. While technological and cultural shifts impacting U.S. dependence on oil are steadily gaining ground, the country consumes more than 19 million barrels of oil each day with half coming from imports; Canada and Mexico are two of the U.S.'s largest energy partners. To boost energy security, create jobs and lower the price at the pump for consumers, the U.S. must work with its continental neighbors to maximize North American oil production. This session explored current and future partnerships across the Northern and Southern borders and new ways the three countries are cooperating to ensure a more secure and reliable resource future.

America runs on oil and like it or not, the nation will continue to do so well into the future. While technological and cultural shifts impacting U.S. dependence on oil are steadily gaining ground, the country consumes more than 19 million barrels of oil each day with half coming from imports; Canada and Mexico are two of the U.S.'s largest energy partners. To boost energy security, create jobs and lower the price at the pump for consumers, the U.S. must work with its continental neighbors to maximize North American oil production. This session explored current and future partnerships across the Northern and Southern borders and new ways the three countries are cooperating to ensure a more secure and reliable resource future.

With recent advances in a process known as hydraulic fracturing or “fracking,” the U.S. may soon be able to boost its energy security while bolstering our economy and creating jobs. Large shale deposits throughout the U.S. are suddenly seeing a flurry of activity that’s being hailed by some for its economic development and criticized by others for environmental concerns. More than 20 percent of U.S. states have proven reserves of oil and gas locked in shale and the economic benefits nationally as well as within each of these states may be tremendous and far-reaching. In this session, experts on all sides of the hydraulic fracturing debate discussed what its production may mean for your state.

The town of Stanley, N.D., was a dying community of about 1,500. But that was before the community opened up to hydrofracturing, or “fracking,” a process that pumps a solution of 99 percent water into rocks to release natural gas. “Now that fracking has moved in, the Farmer’s Union convenience store sold over $1 million in pizza in the past year,” said North Dakota Sen. Dick Dever.  Fracking has been a huge boon to the town’s entire economy.

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