Electricity Transmission

Crady deGolian, Director of CSG’s Compacts Center recently provided an update to Midwestern legislators about CSG’s ongoing efforts to develop an electric transmission line siting compact.  Speaking to the CSG Midwest Energy Committee, deGolian participated on a panel with Jennifer Curran from MISO and Thomas Vitez from ITC Holdings Corp.  During the presentation legislators heard about each of the following:

Staff from CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts recently convened the second Electricity Transmission Line Siting advisory group meeting in Uncasville, CT.  During the meeting panelists continued discussion about the feasibility of an interstate compact designed to improve the process for siting interstate transmission lines.  The panel, which was co-chaired by Rep. Tom Sloan (KS) and Rep. Kim Koppelman (ND), concluded that a national compact that called for a common application process, standard timelines, and a more uniform review process would allow lines to be more efficiently sited across state lines.

The ongoing debate between states officials and the federal government over who has ultimate authority to site interstate transmission lines took a significant twist last month when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that it was unlawful for Department of Energy (DOE) to classify areas as national interstate electric transmission corridors (NIETC) and deem them eligible for fast-track approval without first consulting with the impacted states. The ruling was made in the case of California Wilderness Cooperation v. U.S. Department of Energy. 

 

States face a variety of challenges in the energy and environment arena in 2011, many of them long-standing issues that are now reaching a critical stage where action is needed to prevent worsening impacts. Many, however, also present an opportunity for states to stimulate job creation and create clean energy. Since many of the issues interlink, action taken in one area will often affect the others. Legislators will be looking at the electric transmission system, climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, energy affordability and stimulating the new energy economy.

The United States has vast offshore wind power potential.  Yet despite the potential to produce clean, cost-effective electricity, huge challenges remain to commercial deployment.  However, some progress is already being made toward developing an offshore wind power industry.

Last week, I, along with members of CSG’s National Center for Interstate Compacts, participated in a meeting hosted by the office of Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner Philip Moeller and co-chaired by Rep. Tom Sloan (KS) and Rep. Kim Koppelman (ND).  The meeting explored the potential for interstate compacts to facilitate transmission line siting across state boundaries.

LEXINGTON, Ky. --A national advisory panel comprised of state legislators, federal agency representatives and other key stakeholders met for the first time July 29 and 30 in Washington, D.C., to examine the potential for interstate compacts to improve the efficiency of electricity transmission line siting.

The panel was convened by...

E-Newsletter Issue #53: August 5, 2010

A national advisory panel comprised of state legislators, federal agency representatives and other key stakeholders met for the first time July 29 and 30 in Washington, D.C., to examine the potential for interstate compacts to improve the efficiency of electricity transmission line siting.

The National Center for Interstate Compacts, in conjunction with CSG’s Energy and Environment Task Force, will be convening two advisory committee meetings to explore the possibility of an interstate compact to govern interstate transmission line siting.  The first meeting of the advisory panel,  which will be comprised of state and federal officials, subject matter experts, interested stakeholders, and compact experts, will be hosted by Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner Moeller’s Office July 29 and 30 at FERC headquarters in Washington, DC.  The meeting will be co-chaired by Representative Tom Sloan of Kansas and Representative Kim Koppelman of North Dakota.  For more information about the effort and about the National Center for Interstate Compacts please click here

Wind is a growing source of energy in the U.S., becoming increasingly economical with several environmental benefits.  Policies such as the federal production tax credit and state renewable portfolio standards are crucial to the continued success of wind energy. 

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