Electricity Transmission

Illinois lawmakers have adopted a controversial plan that will increase utility bills in order to upgrade the state's energy infrastructure.

As demand for energy continues to grow—especially electricity generated from renewable sources—so, too, does the need to efficiently move energy across state lines and boost the ability to move resources across international borders. But state, national and international interests often do not align. This lack of a cohesive plan is leading to underdeveloped markets and an overstressed transmission system. This session explored effective tools used in Canada and Mexico, as well as potential domestic policy solutions, all designed to more efficiently move power from where it is generated to where it is needed.

As demand for energy continues to grow—especially electricity generated from renewable sources—so, too, does the need to efficiently move energy across state lines and boost the ability to move resources across international borders. But state, national and international interests often do not align. This lack of a cohesive plan is leading to underdeveloped markets and an overstressed transmission system. This session explored effective tools used in Canada and Mexico, as well as potential domestic policy solutions, all designed to more efficiently move power from where it is generated to where it is needed.

 

As demand for energy continues to grow—especially electricity generated from renewable sources—so, too, does the need to efficiently move energy across state lines and boost the ability to move resources across international borders. But state, national and international interests often do not align. This lack of a cohesive plan is leading to underdeveloped markets and an overstressed transmission system. This session explored effective tools used in Canada and Mexico, as well as potential domestic policy solutions, all designed to more efficiently move power from where it is generated to where it is needed.

Over the past decade, states have created a flurry of activity on energy policy: New renewable portfolio standards, the buildup of smart grids, and new investments in clean-energy generation, for example.

As demand for energy continues to grow—especially electricity generated from renewable sources—so, too, does the need to efficiently move energy across state lines and boost the ability to move resources across international borders. But state, national and international interests often do not align. This lack of a cohesive plan is leading to underdeveloped markets and an overstressed transmission system. This session explored effective tools used in Canada and Mexico, as well as potential domestic policy solutions, all designed to more efficiently move power from where it is generated to where it is needed.

In conjunction with CSG's ongoing efforts to create an electric transmission line siting compact, next week's National Conference and North American Summit will feature a session entitled "If You Build It, Will They Come." The session will focus on the increasing demand for energy, especially electricity generated from renewable resources.  It will also address growing demand and the importance of moving energy across state lines and international borders.  Panelists will discuss effective tools used in Mexico, Canada and the United States, as well as suggest ways for the three nations to work cooperatively to move power more efficiently and effectively from where it is generated to where it is needed.

Efforts being led by CSG to develop an electric transmission line siting compact will renew this week when the compact’s drafting team meets for the first time.  With the expected growth in electricity demand, coupled with the need to bring renewable energy to market and the necessity to enhance and secure the nation’s energy infrastructure, the need for added transmission capacity has never been more apparent.

With this blog post I wanted to take a little time to provide a general update about some of the Compact Center’s ongoing work.  While I have blogged previously about both the Interstate Reciprocity Compact and the Interstate Transmission Line Siting Compact, I thought this was an appropriate time to revisit each project.

Demand for energy is rising, both in the U.S. and around the world. But supplies can’t keep up with demand if energy that is produced in one locale can’t be moved to consumers who need it.  “The challenge of moving energy from where it is produced to where it is needed has never been greater. It is a challenge that not only spans state boundaries, but also international borders,” said Kansas Rep. Tom Sloan.

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