Elections

The Council of State Governments’ Elections Center offers our members and other interested parties data and analysis regarding the 2014 elections. Looking at elections in all three branches of state government from across the nation, the Elections Center is a resource for both pre- and post-election party control data and how the outcomes might affect various policy areas heading into 2015.

Post-Election Legislative Control

 

2014 Gubernatorial Winners

2014 Lieutenant Governor Winners

2014 Secretary of State Winners

2014 Attorney General Winners

2014 Treasurer Winners

2014 Auditor Winners

2014 State Supreme Court Winners

2014 Current State Officials Winning Congressional Seats

In Alabama Legislative Black Caucus v. Alabama the Supreme Court held 5-4 that when determining whether unconstitutional racial gerrymandering occurred—if race was a “predominant motivating factor” in creating districts—one-person-one-vote should be a background factor, not a factor balanced against the use of race.  And Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) does not require a covered jurisdiction to maintain a particular percent of minority voters in minority-majority districts.  The Court sent this case back to the lower court to reconsider in light of its opinion.

Redistricting policy in the United States has become highly partisan, with some state legislatures at odds over where and how to draw district lines and the legality of independent redistricting commissions being considered by the Supreme Court. This eCademy session features national experts on elections and redistricting policy to help state policymakers better understand the contemporary redistricting policy landscape, as well as innovative policy solutions.

Voting in off years is important for overseas military personnel. With the 2014 midterm elections over, military personnel residing overseas might think voting is over until the general election in 2016. Not true. Odd numbered years also hold important elections. 2015 will see elections for school boards, mayors, judges, and other important offices and issues. These elections have a direct impact on citizens. Overseas military personnel help defend the right to vote, and they should exercise the right for themselves.

The Florida Legislature is considering a bill to aid overseas voting by expanding the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot to State and local elections.

Republicans scored major victories in the 2014 elections across the country. Here is a look at the states' elective offices and key initiatives following the sweeping election.

The new advertising campaign for the Federal Voting Assistance Program makes clear its mission for military and civilian voters living overseas: “Americans make small votes every day and we want to make sure that you get your most important vote home.” The program, a part of the U.S. Department of Defense, is using that campaign—in addition to an active social media presence and other efforts—to spread the word about the resources it is providing for citizens living overseas, according to Scott Wiedmann, the Federal Voting Assistance Program’s director of communications.

Only 36.4 percent of eligible voters voted in the 2014 midterm election – the lowest turnout since 1942. Voter turnout during presidential election years is higher than turnout during midterm elections. In 2012, 58.2 percent of eligible voters voted – nearly 20 percentage points higher than the turnout just two years later in a midterm year.   

CSG Midwest logo
Due to a mix of legislative actions and ballot initiatives this year, the minimum wage for workers has recently increased in two Midwestern states and will rise in two others starting in 2015. Proposed wage hikes appeared on ballots in Nebraska and South Dakota in November and won by comfortable margins.
CSG Midwest logo

With the notable exceptions of Illinois and Minnesota, this November’s elections did little to change the partisan balance of power in Midwestern states.

On Nov. 4 Oregon voters rejected a contentious state law that would have granted driver’s cards to Oregonians who can’t prove legal residency. The legislature passed the bill in 2013, but opponents of the law gathered enough signatures to send the measure to the polls as a ballot initiative. With two-thirds of the vote in dissension, the law was stopped dead in its tracks. 

In order to secure an alternative driver'...

Pages