The Council of State Governments’ Elections Center offers our members and other interested parties data and analysis regarding the 2014 elections. Looking at elections in all three branches of state government from across the nation, the Elections Center is a resource for both pre- and post-election party control data and how the outcomes might affect various policy areas heading into 2015.

Post-Election Legislative Control


2014 Gubernatorial Winners

2014 Lieutenant Governor Winners

2014 Secretary of State Winners

2014 Attorney General Winners

2014 Treasurer Winners

2014 Auditor Winners

2014 State Supreme Court Winners

2014 Current State Officials Winning Congressional Seats

During a recent eCademy webcast, “Policy Recommendations to Improve Military and Overseas Voting,” members of The Council of State Governments’ Overseas Voting Initiative Policy Working Group discussed tools that improve the voting process for U.S. military members and civilians who are overseas.

U.S. military and civilian overseas voters are often located in remote areas abroad, lacking access to the voting information and technology used by stateside voters in their home voting precincts, making it challenging for Americans overseas to cast their ballots. Variations in how states conduct elections and, in particular, how absentee ballots are provided, returned and counted can make voting even more complex. In this FREE CSG eCademy webcast, members of The Council of State Governments’ Overseas Voting Initiative Policy Working Group explore policy recommendations that can help states improve the U.S. military and civilian overseas voting process.

The 2014 election resulted in Republican dominance of state legislative control unmatched in nearly a century. Riding a surge of disaffection with a president in the sixth year of office, combined with low, midterm voter turnout among Democrats, Republicans won big. They also continued to benefit from a built in redistricting advantage stemming from the 2010 election success by the party. Essentially, everything went one direction in the 2014 election—the direction of the Grand Old Party.

Voters who want to share a selfie with their marked ballot on Election Day need to think twice. Many states make it a crime to take photos or videos in the voting booth, and at least one state has adopted strict new penalties for sharing your ballot selfie via social media. States with such bans say the laws are necessary to ensure ballot secrecy and discourage vote selling, but election officials say the prohibitions are tough to enforce. In an era where more and more voters have smartphones, states are grappling with just how smart it is to ban ballot selfies.

There were many issues facing governors in 2014. Even as the stock market rebounded and state budgets grew at a moderate pace, unemployment and underemployment remained high. Public discontent with government has been indiscriminate in its focus, levied at not only politicians in Washington, but also those in state capitals. This led to political fallout from voters as they vented their anger and frustration on elected leaders on Election Day.1

Every state has a system for asking voters to show that they are who they say they are. The most restrictive of such laws have drawn court challenge. This litigation is as varied as the voter ID regimes: cases have proceeded on different facts in different contexts, under different legal theories. 

Over a decade ago, States began to explore the use of electronic technology in the U.S. military and overseas voting process. This article explores the varying policy solutions and technology platforms administered by Alaska, Arizona and Washington as well as emerging federal requirements affecting U.S. military and overseas voters. 

Chapter 6 of the 2015 Book of the States contains the following articles and tables:

The Presidential Commission on Election Administration made several recommendations in its report to the President which draw attention to the need to modernize voter registration in the United States. This article highlights the recommendations which have been demonstrated by states to be successful policies while also addressing existing federal laws governing the registration of voters.

Voters looked favorably on ballot propositions in 2014, approving 67 percent of the 158 measures they decided. Marijuana advocates scored important victories in Alaska, Oregon and Washington, D.C., and minimum wage advocates continued their unbroken run of successful measures in five more states.