Safe & Healthy Academic Environments

More than 1 million people are living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S., and are living longer since drug treatments became available in the 1990's.  African-Americans are disproportionately affected, and represent nearly half of all people living with HIV.  More than half of all Americans living with HIV reside in southern states.  State Medicaid and prevention programs are connecting with communities to help HIV/AIDS patients stay productive and to prevent HIV transmission. Effective policies include HIV testing as part of routine medical care and increasing public awareness of the need for HIV testing.

CSG South

The maintenance challenges for school facilities can vary significantly by a range of factors, including the age of the building, level of use, the time since last renovation or major systems overhaul, local climate, and the type of building. Nonetheless, there is a universal need for school administrators and facilities staff to monitor the condition of school buildings. The reality, however, is that maintenance is often inconsistent or occasional, and monitoring of building conditions is irregular.

Typically, state policies favor new construction over maintenance. This is not universally the case, and a handful of states have policies in place that promote and encourage building maintenance. Among these policies are state maintenance allotments and building inspection programs, particularly tied to school and district school facility plans. Requiring schools to set aside a percentage of their budget for maintenance and repair is a more active step in ensuring school facilities investments are cared for over the long haul.

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments encourages Congress to align the School Meal Initiative Standards with current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, urges states to work with their U.S. senators and representatives to ensure that schools are meeting those guidelines, and urges state legislators to work with their Departments of Education to ensure local school districts are meeting the nutritional standards already in place.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments strongly supports the implementation of a comprehensive, national Farm to School program that helps schools provide staff training, conduct menu planning, locate sources of locally produced food, purchase food, and assists farmers and schools to purchase the necessary equipment to encourage the utilization of locally produced food products.

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments supports and encourages states to enforce existing U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations that prohibit serving foods of minimal nutritional value during mealtimes in school food service areas, including vending machines.

 

This Act limits prohibits schools from offering or providing access to students in kindergarten through high school foods containing artificial trans fat. The measure applies to vending machines and schools’ food service establishments before and during school hours.

 

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments representing state, provincial and territorial policy leaders urge the support of S.790 and make certain that all states and territories in the nation have access to this necessary service to low-income children in our communities; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to all members of Congress serving on the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Committee; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that a copy of this resolution be sent to the commissioners of agriculture of U.S. states and territories.
 

CSG South

If, as is often suggested, fresh food is a key component in improving school lunches, then connecting farms to schools represents a logical solution to the child nutrition problem. Farm to school programs promote the use of locally produced foods in school nutrition programs and often include educational activities about local food and farming issues. Farm to school programs also can increase fresh fruit and vegetable options available to students, and have been shown to increase consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables among participating students.

Pages